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I tried to look through a lot of similar questions but I have a specific query. I have two or more sets of strings (space separated values). I want to loop through

firstString="f1 f2 f3 f4"
secondString="s1 s2 s3 s4"

I want something like

f1-s1
f2-s2
f3-s3
f4-s4

(in a single loop)

I must be able to take the positional value of the second and further arrays in a single loop.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried associative arrays? (bash >=4.0) – Daenyth Oct 3 '11 at 18:10
1  
    
I'm not sure if it's an exact duplicate, but that the answers from that question should help answer this one as well. – Michael Hoffman Oct 3 '11 at 20:57
    
Associative array is a very good concept and could also be used in similar issues(depending on the type of requirement). Thanks for the info. – explorer Oct 4 '11 at 8:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, if you first replace all spaces with a new-line, using tr so that you have each value on a separate line, then paste will solve your problem:

$ cat a b
f1
f2
f3
f4
s1
s2
s3
s4

$ paste -d- a b
f1-s1
f2-s2
f3-s3
f4-s4

Pure bash solution:

#!/bin/bash

firstString='f1 f2 f3 f4'
secondString='s1 s2 s3 s4'

read -ra FIRST <<< "$firstString"
read -ra SECOND <<< "$secondString"

index=0
for i in ${FIRST[@]}
do
    echo $i-${SECOND[$index]}
    ((index++))
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution. I was looking for the pure bash solution you gave as I can take in as puch pairs of string as I wish. The non-pure solution also works for known inputs :) – explorer Oct 4 '11 at 8:17

You could make use of bash built-in arrays:

first=(f1 f2 f3 f4)
second=(s1 s2 s3 s4)
for (( i = 0; i < ${#first[*]}; i++ )); do
    echo ${first[$i]}-${second[$i]}
done
share|improve this answer
    
Although we know the input. they are not in the form of arrays but strings. Also note that it can be more than 2 sets of string – explorer Oct 4 '11 at 6:49
    
@explorer: The input does not need to be an array already. If they're strings you simply put their content inside the parantheses: str="f1 f2 f3 f4"; strArr=($str). It's that simple. As for the more than 2 sets, just add "third", "fourth" and so on... :) – Costi Ciudatu Oct 4 '11 at 12:05
    
This is a very elegant way of creating arrays. Thanks for this useful tip. – explorer Oct 5 '11 at 9:27

see the test with awk below:

kent$  firstStr="f1 f2 f3 f4"
kent$  secondStr="s1 s2 s3 s4"

#now we have two variable


kent$  echo 1|awk -v two=$secondStr -v one=$firstStr '{split(one,a);split(two,b);for(i=1;i<=length(a);i++)print a[i]"-"b[i]}' 
f1-s1
f2-s2
f3-s3
f4-s4
share|improve this answer
    
The solution is very useful but I am loking for two or more pair of strings in which case this might be a little diffcult to use – explorer Oct 4 '11 at 8:16

You can easily do it in a portable manner:

set $firstString
for s in $secondString; do
  echo "$1-$s"
  shift
done
share|improve this answer

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