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I don't understand this code:

$outputFunction($dst, $resized, $quality);

It's not a function e.g myfunction()

It's not a variable e.g $variable = $variable2

What is it?

The code works in the script i have downloaded, i just can't figure out how that piece of code can work...maybe i'm just tired or something..

Thanks.

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1  
what is the question again? –  Ibu Oct 3 '11 at 18:14
3  
It's a "variable function", which applies to functions as "variable variables" apply to values. –  Marc B Oct 3 '11 at 18:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

$outputFunction holds the name of the function. Thus, if $outputFunction holds the value "calculate", then calculate($dst, $resized, $quality) is invoked.

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I love this website!! Free expert knowledge in no time! –  user977150 Oct 3 '11 at 20:14
    
I don't understand why you would use variable functions, why can't you just use the real name of the function? Instead of using $outputFunction for example? –  user977150 Oct 3 '11 at 20:17
    
Ok, no need to answer, i have figured it out :-D –  user977150 Oct 3 '11 at 20:25
    
A good example where variable functions are useful is the CMS system Drupal which allows modules (plugins/extensions) to "hook" into the workflow of the CMS system. This is done by having the CMS system to invoke functions implemented by the modules. The function names always start with the name of the module which implements the function, and this is where the variable function names come in handy as they need to be determined "on the fly" based on the module name. –  sbrattla Oct 3 '11 at 21:03

To add to sbrattla's answer, you can also define anonymous functions in PHP 5.3 (I think), so

$var = function($a) { /* do something */ return $b; }
echo $var(123);
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in php you can do something like

$outputFunction = 'myFunction';
$outputFunction(args);

and it works calling the function normally

variable functions

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These are variable functions.

$outputFunction is evaluated to obtain the name of the function to which the operands will be applied.

There's an entire page dedicated to this topic in the PHP manual.

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The string should initialized some lines before. You can consider this as a pointer of funcrion which allows to change the executed method.

Php will recognize your syntax and will launch the function named in your string (computed one if you want)

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