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I'm using a Signal-Slot C++ implementation found here: https://github.com/pbhogan/Signals to implement event listeners within a user interface library I'm developing.

The user-facing API goes like so:

class DialEventListener : public EventListener {

    void handleEvent(Event event){
        …
        cout << "Event on" << event.source.name << end;
    }
}
int main(){
    Interactor dial1;
    dial1.addListener(ROTATE_EVENT, DialEventListener());
    … 
}

To define an event listener, a user would subclass EventListener to create a custom event handler. But in the implementation of Interactor::addListener() where I use the Signals.h code you have to provide a member function pointer as well as a class instance pointer to connect a Delegate to some Signal.

Below is an code snippet showing how I'm trying to use Signals to implement event listeners. I use a map from EventTypes to Signal to account for an interactor that triggers multiple types of events.

typedef map< EventType, Signal1<Event> > EventTypeListenerMap;
class Interactor {

private:
   EventTypeListenerMap listener_map;

public:
   void TriggerEvent(Event e){
       Signal1<Event> signal = listener_map[e.type];
       signal(e);
   }

   void addListener(EventType e_type, EventListener listener){
      …
          //Find the signal for a particular kind of event.
      Signal1<TUIKitEvent> signal = listener_map[e_type];
          //Plug a delegate into that signal's slot
      signal.Connect( &listener, &EventListener::handleEvent); 
   }
   void addListener(EventType e_type, EventListener listener, void (EventListener::*handler)(Event)){
      …
      Signal1<TUIKitEvent> signal = listener_map[e_type];
      signal.Connect( &listener, handler); 
   }

}    

class EventListener  {
    virtual void handleEvent(Event event){
    }
}

The fact that I'm using a Signal-Slot implementation should be hidden from the user, so I just wrote this version of Interactor::addListener(EventType, EventListener, void (EventListener::*)) as a sanity check to make sure I was passing the right member function pointer to be bound to that signal. But member function pointers are class specific, so how can one define a function with a signatures that accepts pointers to methods of classes derived from EventListener, which likely don't yet exist?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't think that the question is really clear... why do you want to pass a member function pointer to a derived method and not just a member function to the base type and have the dynamic dispatch resolve the final overrider for you? Maybe you should add a small piece of code pointing out what the user code looks like and the behavior you want from it... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 3 '11 at 19:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are two approaches for callbacks, either you provide an interface that has a virtual function that will be called, or else you perform type-erasure to make it fully generic. In the second version you either use a prepacked solution for the type-erasure or you will need to use some templates to implement it yourself.

The expected user code that you show in the first block follows the first approach, and is sufficient for the basic needs. But note that you will probably want to use pointers or references in a couple of the places where you are passing by value:

// user code
Interactor dial;
DialEventListener dial_listener;
dial.addListener( ROTATE_EVENT, dial_listener );

// implementation
void Interactor::addListener( EventType event, EventListener & listener ) {
   Signal1<TUIKitEvent> & sgn = listener_map[event];
   sgn.Connect( &listener, &EventListener::handleEvent );
};

Note a couple of changes: the listener argument is passed by reference rather than value. If you pass by value you will get slicing (only the EventListener subobject will be copied, and it will not be a DialEventListener object inside addListener. By passing a reference to the base type, you can use it as a base while the object maintains its identity.

That in turn requires that the object you pass in is not a temporary (you cannot use DialEventListener() as second argument to addListener, as the lifetime of the temporary will end at the end of the full expression and that means you will have a dangling reference (in your current implementation you have a dangling pointer inside the signal implementation, which will most probably cause UB once the signal is triggered).

Additionally, inside addListener you don't want to copy the signal stored in the map, but rather modify it, so again, you should use a reference rather than a value when accessing the signal in the map.

The documentation of your class should be quite explicit in that the lifetime of the object passed in must outlive the Interactor (or else allow for deregistration so that the client can remove the handler from the Interactor before the callback is destroyed (again, if you don't you will end in UB)

The other approach is performing type-erasure, I have never used that particular signals library so I am playing by ear here. The signal library that you are using (probably) implements type-erasure internally, but you need to be able to forward the exact type until the lib can perform the erasure, or else use a different type erasure library in the interface.

// Transferring the exact type to the signal lib:
class Interactor {
// ...
public:
   template <typename Listener>
   void addListener( EventType event, Listener & listener, void (Listener::*callback)(Event) ) {
      Signal1<TUIKitEvent> & sgn = listener_map[event];
      sgn.connect( &listener, callback );
   }
//...

Using a different type erasure library in the interface might or not be possible depending on the semantics of the connect method in your signals implementation. If it copies the first argument, then you can probably make do with std::function:

class Interactor {
//...
public:
   void addListener( EventType event, std::function< void (Event) > callback ) {
       Signal1<TUIKitEvent> & sgn = listener_map[event];
       sgn.connect( callback, &std::function<void(Event)>::operator() );
   }
//...
};

Assuming that the library will copy the first argument and maintain it's own copy internally (i.e. assuming that it behaves somehow like boost::signal library). On the user side, they will have to perform the type erasure:

struct AnotherListener {   // no need to explicitly derive from EventListner now!
   void method( Event e ) {}
};
int main() {
   Interactor dial;
   AnotherEventListener listener;
   dial.addListener( dial, std::bind( &AnotherListener::method, &listener ) );
}

The exact syntax of bind might not be that, I have never used it from the new standard in the boost library it would have been boost::bind( &AnotherListener::method, &listener, _1 );...

share|improve this answer
    
Both methods work. My original problem was that I wasn't passing the listener in by reference, which was why it was calling EventListener::handleEvent() and not DialEventListener::handleEvent(). I stumbled upon something similar to the 2nd approach where I created a function template like so: template<class T, class U>addListener(EventType, T listener, void (U::handleEvent)(Event)). Thanks for your answer. –  corntoole Oct 4 '11 at 20:01
    
I find it slightly amusing that, having a library that performs type erasure (and thus frees the user from implementing an exact interface) you would just wrap that up with what is a less flexible approach... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 4 '11 at 20:08
    
It was probably some other error on my part that I eventually eliminated, but the library's erasure has two class parameters and since member function pointers are class specific that may have been my issue: See template< class X, class Y > void Connect( Y * obj, void (X::*func)() ) { delegateList.insert( MakeDelegate( obj, func ) ); } –  corntoole Oct 4 '11 at 20:14
    
As I said, I don't know that library, but I have used boost::signal library before (it has been changed into boost::signal2 IIRC) and it was quite flexible in what it allowed (by combining the library with boost::bind (in C++11 you can use std::bind)... just saying... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 4 '11 at 20:29

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