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So I created the following related Classes and I'm trying to do Code-First approach. I want the Quote class to reference 3 instances of the User class by 3 different navigable property names, but when I do DBInitializer to populate and create the DB, the Quote table has 6 columns instead of the expected 3 columns, of which 3 are always null. The navigable properties point to those 3 null columns, so whenever I point to Quote.Manager or one of the other 3 properties, it returns null instead of the actual manager. How can I fix this?

Quote Class (I left a little off, but you get the point):

using System.Web;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

namespace QuoteManager.Models
{
    public class Quote
    {
        public int QuoteID { get; set; }

        public virtual int StateID { get; set; }
        public virtual State State { get; set; }

        public virtual int CreatorID { get; set; }
        public virtual User Creator { get; set; }
        public virtual int AgentID { get; set; }
        public virtual User Agent { get; set; }
        public virtual int ManagerID { get; set; }
        public virtual User Manager { get; set; }
    }
}

User class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;

namespace QuoteManager.Models
{
    public class User
    {

        public User()
        {
            this.Quotes = new HashSet<Quote>();
            this.CreatedQuotes = new HashSet<Quote>();
            this.ManagedQuotes = new HashSet<Quote>();
        }

        public int UserID { get; set; }
        public virtual string FirstName { get; set; }
        public virtual string LastName { get; set; }
        public virtual string Phone { get; set; }
        public virtual string Email { get; set; }

        public virtual ICollection<Quote> Quotes { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<Quote> CreatedQuotes { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<Quote> ManagedQuotes { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<Note> Notes { get; set; }

    }
}
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3 Answers 3

Use the InverseProperty attribute to specify the other property participating in the relationship

public class Quote
{
    public int QuoteID { get; set; }

    public virtual int StateID { get; set; }
    public virtual State State { get; set; }

    public virtual int CreatorID { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("CreatedQuotes")]
    public virtual User Creator { get; set; }

    public virtual int AgentID { get; set; }
    public virtual User Agent { get; set; }

    public virtual int ManagerID { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("ManagedQuotes")]
    public virtual User Manager { get; set; }
}

public class User
{
    public User()
    {
        this.Quotes = new HashSet<Quote>();
        this.CreatedQuotes = new HashSet<Quote>();
        this.ManagedQuotes = new HashSet<Quote>();
    }

    public int UserID { get; set; }
    public virtual string FirstName { get; set; }
    public virtual string LastName { get; set; }
    public virtual string Phone { get; set; }
    public virtual string Email { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Quote> Quotes { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("Creator")]
    public virtual ICollection<Quote> CreatedQuotes { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("Manager")]
    public virtual ICollection<Quote> ManagedQuotes { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Note> Notes { get; set; }

}

Similarly map the other relations.

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Perfect...that is what I was looking for. Microsoft's documentation takes some getting used to and I didn't see that annotation. –  Watermark Studios Oct 4 '11 at 15:35

Add the attribute [ForeignKey("Creator")] to the CreatorID and so on for the other 2 property pairs.

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2 Things came up: 1) The foreign key constraint creates a problem because there are three foreign keys for the same entity type, so I have to turn the constraint to set to null...not sure how to do that with annotations. 2) It seems that the Collections in the User class don't match up with the foreign key properties in the Quote class since the DB is creating AgentID table column and a User_UserID column (same for the other 2). –  Watermark Studios Oct 3 '11 at 19:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

FINAL SOLUTION

Thanks to your reference to InverseProperty I found an amazing article that covers exactly what I wanted to accomplish using fluent API. This article was written in January, but I'm pretty sure CTP5 is now officially part of the MVC 3 and EF core.

Associations in EF Code First CTP5

Okay...I'm going to document what I found to work great! I hate it when people leave partial answers, so here we go.

There is a little redundancy here, but it works. My Quote Class looks like this:

    [ForeignKey("Creator")]
    public virtual int CreatorID { get; set; }
    [InverseProperty("CreatedQuotes")]
    public virtual User Creator { get; set; }

    [ForeignKey("Agent")]
    public virtual int AgentID { get; set; }
    [InverseProperty("OwnedQuotes")]
    public virtual User Agent { get; set; }

    [ForeignKey("Manager")]
    public virtual int ManagerID { get; set; }
    [InverseProperty("ManagedQuotes")]
    public virtual User Manager { get; set; }

Then my User class looks like this:

    public virtual ICollection<Quote> CreatedQuotes { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Quote> OwnedQuotes { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Quote> ManagedQuotes { get; set; }

Finally, my DBContext class looks like this:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();

        modelBuilder.Entity<Quote>()
            .HasRequired(a => a.Manager)
            .WithMany()
            .HasForeignKey(u => u.ManagerID);

        modelBuilder.Entity<Quote>()
                    .HasRequired(a => a.Agent)
                    .WithMany()
                    .HasForeignKey(u => u.AgentID).WillCascadeOnDelete(false);

        modelBuilder.Entity<Quote>()
                    .HasRequired(a => a.Manager)
                    .WithMany()
                    .HasForeignKey(u => u.ManagerID).WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
    }

You can see the redundancy in the ForeignKey annotation in the Quote class and the Fluent API mapping in the DbContext class, but it's not hurting anything. I could probably do away with the annotations in the Quote class, but the Fluent API is necessary to set the cascading rule to false to prevent foreign key conflicts.

I have been able to navigate both directions with no problems and exactly as expected.

Thanks for all your help!

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