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I add table and it's raws by jQuery when find result in database,and remove table when don't find anything.It works correctly.

$("#AdminSearch").bind("change keyup", function() { 
       var url = "http://localhost/PmMusic/index.php/admin/ajax/admin_search/"+$("#AdminSearch").val();
        $.getJSON(url,function(data){
            if (data.length == 0)
            {
                $("#AutoSearch").hide(1000);
                $("#AutoSearchTable").remove();
            }
            else
            {
                $("#AutoSearchTable").remove();
                $("#AutoSearch").append('<table id="AutoSearchTable">');
                for(var i = 0;i < data.length && i < 5;i++)
                    {
                     $("#AutoSearchTable").append('<tr><td id="TableSearchTR'+i+'" value="'+data[i]+'">'+data[i]+'</td></tr>');
                    }
                $("#AutoSearch").append('</table>');
                $("#AutoSearch").show(1000);    
            }
        });

    });

but when I wanna select tr by following code

    $('tr').click(function(){
        alert("Hi");
    });

When I click on other table tr in page it works,but it can't select tr which added by upper code). where is the problem?

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2  
You don't need $("#AutoSearch").append('</table>'); because the first append will add an entire table element. –  Dennis Oct 3 '11 at 19:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's because you're binding with .click, which only applies to elements already in the page.

Change your code to

$('tr').live('click', function(){
    alert("Hi");
});
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1  
.delegate() would give better performance because it would not have to traverse the entire DOM –  ShaneBlake Oct 3 '11 at 19:30
    
@ShaneBlake As far as I know, the only difference is that delegate forces you to give a context to it. .live with a context have similar performance. I guess (no proof), that in this particular case, that there won't be much difference, as jQuery will use native getElementsByTagName, which is fast. –  Andre Oct 3 '11 at 19:43
    
With .live() the context is the top of the DOM, so there could be quite a bit of difference, actually... –  ShaneBlake Oct 4 '11 at 16:09
    
I know, but you can specify the context: $('tr', context).live(handler);, or $('#contextId tr').live(handler);. In both cases, they'll have performance similar to delegate's. –  Andre Oct 4 '11 at 18:02
    
In the OP example, where (looks like) there's only one table and all trs in the page will be bounded, there won't be a difference in giving a context –  Andre Oct 4 '11 at 18:08

You need to use .live() or .delegate() to attach click events to dynamically-created elements.

$("#AdminSearch").delegate("tr","click",function() {
    alert("Hi");
});
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If the TR is not there when your .click() function is added, then it won't have a click event attached. You should look at using the .delegate() function instead.

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click() will only work for elements already in the DOM. If you're loading in some content w/ ajax then I would suggest live().

$('tr').live('click', function() {
  alert("Hi");
});
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