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I am using the ReSharper to re-factor my code. When I try to move a block of code to the method, I get the following warning:

The extracted code has multiple entry points

Here is the method signature I am planning to use:

private void GetRatePlanComponents(ProductPlan productPlan, 
    ProductRatePlan productRatePlan)    

I Googled it for a while to understand what does it mean. But didn't have much luck.

Would it be possible for you to explain it to me please?

For your reference, here is the code snippet I am trying to move to a seprate method:

QueryResult productRatePlanChargeQueryResult = 
    _zuoraService.query(string.Format(@"select Id, Name, IncludedUnits from
        ProductRatePlanCharge where ProductRatePlanId = '{0}' and 
        ChargeModel = 'Overage Pricing'", productRatePlan.Id));

if (productRatePlanChargeQueryResult.size > 0)
{
    foreach (ProductRatePlanCharge productRatePlanCharge 
        in productRatePlanChargeQueryResult.records)
    {
        string numberOfUnits = productRatePlanCharge.IncludedUnits.ToString();

        if (productRatePlanCharge.Name.Equals("Users"))
        {
            productPlan.NumberofUsers = numberOfUnits;
        }
        else if (productRatePlanCharge.Name.Equals("Projects"))
        {
            productPlan.NumberofProjects = numberOfUnits;
        }
        else if (productRatePlanCharge.Name.Equals("Storage"))
        {
            decimal volumeOfStorage;
            if (decimal.TryParse(productRatePlanCharge.IncludedUnits.ToString(), 
                out volumeOfStorage))
            {
                if (volumeOfStorage < 1) volumeOfStorage *= 1000;
                    productPlan.VolumeofStorage = volumeOfStorage.ToString();
                }
                else
                {
                    productPlan.VolumeofStorage = numberOfUnits;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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3  
Are you sure it says multiple entry points rather than exit points? Does it point at a particular line? Is that the entirety of the method? Can you include the method signature? –  Jon Skeet Oct 3 '11 at 19:43
    
@Jon Skeet: Yes. it says "entry point". Have a look at the updated question. –  Moon Oct 3 '11 at 20:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It looks like you may have encountered a known issue:

public static IEnumerable<ITagPrefixHolder> GetRelevantHolders(IPsiSourceFile sourceFile )
{
  var targetPath = FileSystemPath.Empty;
  var projectFile = sourceFile.ToProjectFile();
  if (projectFile != null)
    targetPath = projectFile.Location;

  foreach(var holder in GetRelevantHoldersBeforeFile(sourceFile, targetPath))
    yield return holder;

  foreach(var holder in GetHoldersInFile(sourceFile, targetPath))
    yield return holder;
}

Select both foreach-loops and extract method. It gives strange warning that the fragment has multiple entry points (??!) and results in the following code:

public static IEnumerable<ITagPrefixHolder> GetRelevantHolders(IPsiSourceFile sourceFile )
{
  var targetPath = FileSystemPath.Empty;
  var projectFile = sourceFile.ToProjectFile();
  if (projectFile != null)
    targetPath = projectFile.Location;

  foreach(var tagPrefixHolder in Foo(sourceFile, targetPath))
       yield return tagPrefixHolder;
}

private static IEnumerable<ITagPrefixHolder> Foo(IPsiSourceFile sourceFile, FileSystemPath targetPath)
{
  foreach(var holder in GetRelevantHoldersBeforeFile(sourceFile, targetPath))
    yield return holder;
  foreach(var holder in GetHoldersInFile(sourceFile, targetPath))
    yield return holder;
}

It would be better to replace generated foreach with simple return Foo(sourceFile, targetPath);.

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I have seen ReSharper do this same thing when the code I was trying to extract had a couple of throw statements.

You can do what I did in that case--systematically comment out one line at a time until you find the one that ReSharper trips over. Then you can extract the method and uncomment the line afterwards.

Or you can just refactor it by hand.

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