Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of points:

points = {{0.144, 1.20}, {0.110, 1.60}, {0.083, 2.00}, {0.070, 2.40},
         {0.060, 2.80}, {0.053, 3.20}, {0.050, 3.60}, {0.043, 4.00}}

I want to pass each point to this function, returning a new point:

coordinate[length_,frequence_] = {(1/(2*length)) , (frequence*1000)}

Which should result in a list like so:

 { {3.47, 12 000}, {4.54, 16 000}, ... }

I've been trying to do so with map:

 data = Map[coordinate, points]

It yields something like:

 {coordinate[{0.144, 1.2}], coordinate[{0.11, 1.6}]}

At first that seems correct, except it passes a list rather than just arguments. However, even if I change my coordinate function to accept a list (by changing the expected parameter to list_ and changing length to list[[1]] and frequence to list[[2]]), I won't be able to use the list returned by that map for e.g. linear regression by LinearModelFit[data, x, x]["BestFit"].

share|improve this question
1  
for the record, in English the word is frequency; frequence is technically acceptable I think but never ever used –  ninjagecko Oct 3 '11 at 21:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The simplest way that uses your definition, is Apply at level 1 which has the shorthand @@@. (See the more info part of the Apply documentation.) So, you want

points = {{0.144, 1.20}, {0.110, 1.60}, {0.083, 2.00}, {0.070, 
   2.40}, {0.060, 2.80}, {0.053, 3.20}, {0.050, 3.60}, {0.043, 4.00}}

coordinate[length_, frequence_] := {(1/(2*length)), (frequence*1000)}

coordinate @@@ points

Note that I've changed your definition into a SetDelayed instead of just Set (pay attention to the syntax highlighting showing you the localized variables on the right hand side). See the Immediate and Delayed Definitions guide page.

This said, it's probably best to make coordinate take a list instead of a sequence, as done in belisarius' and ninjagecko's answers, i.e.,

coordinate[{length_, frequence_}] := {(1/(2*length)), (frequence*1000)}
share|improve this answer
2  
Personally I like the Apply[.., 1] approach better -- I think it makes for code that is easier to read/write. (For some reason I have an aversion to using Part unless I absolutely have to...) –  Brett Champion Oct 3 '11 at 21:50
2  
@Brett I share your feeling regarding the aesthetics, but sometimes I'd choose the Part - based one due to the performance considerations. For large lists, using Apply will generally prevent auto-compilation. Does not matter if we define coordinate with patterns, but does matter if we use pure functions like coordinate = {#/2, #2*1000} & for Apply[...,1] and coordinatePart = {#[[1]]/2, #[[2]]*1000} & for Map. Using a test sample like pointsFreqs = RandomReal[{1, 10}, {100000, 2}];, you can observe significant performance advantage of auto-compiling Map over Apply. –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 3 '11 at 22:00
1  
@Brett: I agree, using Part looks ugly and make the code harder to read: "what doe the variable list[[2]] refer to?". (Edit: although Leonid does make a good point!) –  Simon Oct 3 '11 at 22:01
    
Thanks for your detailed answer on Apply/Map and the Set/SetDelayed reference. –  Sirupsen Oct 3 '11 at 22:05
coordinate[{length_, frequence_}] := {(1/(2*length)), (frequence*1000)}
data = coordinate /@ points
(*
->{{3.47222, 1200.}, {4.54545, 1600.}, {...
*)

And

lm = LinearModelFit[data, x, x]
(*
-> -40.3573 + 348.678 x
*)

Show[ListPlot[data], Plot[lm[x], {x, 0, 15}], Frame -> True]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
How did you make the graph go from 0 to 15? I have what seems to be the exact same code as you, however, my graph starts immediately after the first point: gist.github.com/e0fedb1281339298706f –  Sirupsen Oct 3 '11 at 22:03
    
@Sirupsen Plot[lm[x], {x, 0, 15}] –  belisarius Oct 3 '11 at 22:05
    
Yes, I have that exact same code. –  Sirupsen Oct 3 '11 at 22:06
    
@Sirupsen I ran your code, and the resulting plot is equal to mine ... –  belisarius Oct 3 '11 at 22:06
1  
@Sirupsen Try Show[Plot[lm[x], {x, 0, 15}], ListPlot[data], Frame -> True] –  belisarius Oct 3 '11 at 22:19

Change your definition to

coordinate[point_] := {(1/(2*point[[1]])) , (point[[2]]*1000)}
share|improve this answer
coordinate[{length_, frequence_}] := {1/(2*length), frequence*1000}
coordinate /@ points

sidenote: I would personally stay away from the @@@ that has been proposed in other answers, since it feels awkward to me as a programmer. But those answers are also certainly valid.

share|improve this answer
2  
oops, I made a typo and didn't do :=. Anything this is what you want because anything inside [...] can be a pattern, e.g. coordinate[PATTERN]. –  ninjagecko Oct 3 '11 at 21:44

Alternatively, you could use Apply instead of Map:

coordinate @@@ points

output:

{{3.47222, 1200.}, {4.54545, 1600.}, {6.0241, 2000.}, {7.14286, 2400.}, 
 {8.33333, 2800.}, {9.43396, 3200.}, {10., 3600.}, {11.6279, 4000.}}
share|improve this answer
    
Not disagreeing with the answer. For the record though, while @@@ is technically calling Apply, Mathematica defines Apply in a weird way. I'd say @@@ is more like currying Apply[#1, ???] (with the first argument), then Mapping the resulting anonymous function over the second argument. (At least according to most other definitions of Apply.) –  ninjagecko Oct 3 '11 at 22:14

I feel that @@@ is the cleanest way to handle this. However, if you can to redefine coordinate but you do not want remove its existing syntax, you may consider this construct.

Clear[coordinate]
coordinate[length_, frequence_] := {(2 length)^-1, 1000 frequence}
coordinate[l_List] := Apply[coordinate, l, {-2}]

The new line adds a definition to handle lists. This assumes that your arguments are not themselves objects with depth. It allows for quite a bit of flexibility in the way you use the function:

coordinate[0.144, 1.20]

(*Out= {3.47222, 1200.} *)

coordinate[{0.144, 1.20}]

(*Out= {3.47222, 1200.} *)

coordinate[points]

(*Out= {{3.47222, 1200.}, {4.54545, 1600.}, {6.0241, 
  2000.}, {7.14286, 2400.}, {8.33333, 2800.}, {9.43396, 3200.}, {10., 
  3600.}, {11.6279, 4000.}} *)

coordinate /@ points

(*Out= {{3.47222, 1200.}, {4.54545, 1600.}, {6.0241, 
  2000.}, {7.14286, 2400.}, {8.33333, 2800.}, {9.43396, 3200.}, {10., 
  3600.}, {11.6279, 4000.}} *)

coordinate @@@ points

(*Out= {{3.47222, 1200.}, {4.54545, 1600.}, {6.0241, 
  2000.}, {7.14286, 2400.}, {8.33333, 2800.}, {9.43396, 3200.}, {10., 
  3600.}, {11.6279, 4000.}} *)
share|improve this answer
    
Have you seen the Mathematica proposal at Area51? It used to be in the "Definition" phase for a while but we managed to push it into "Commitment" and it's steadily growing. I didn't see your name in the list, so just letting you know so that you can join! –  r.m. Oct 9 '11 at 19:44
1  
@yoda Okay, I took a look at it, but I don't really see the point. It seems to me that StackOverflow, CodeReview, etc., are already available. I don't believe there is an all-encompassing C# SE site; why do you feel we need a Mathematica one? –  Mr.Wizard Oct 10 '11 at 13:53
    
Mma is more of a complete package rather than just a language and that leads to fragmentation between existing sites. Half the questions asked on Stack Overflow shouldn't be asked here. We just are accepting of it and don't close. If you want examples of sites that have successfully branched off from SO, you can look at WordPress Development, Drupal Answers and SharePoint. –  r.m. Oct 10 '11 at 15:37
1  
@yoda But also look at Code Golf. Golfing questions received a lot of attention here, and (I think) it was fun. The new site instead has very low traffic, and most answers never get upvoted. Example:codegolf.stackexchange.com/questions/3731/… –  belisarius Oct 11 '11 at 4:12
    
@belisarius Fair enough, you have a point there... I guess we'll cross the bridge when we get to it. I wouldn't be surprised if they shut it down in beta because the questions are a perfect fit for Stack Overflow :D –  r.m. Oct 11 '11 at 5:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.