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where is the vim plugin directory in ubuntu. I need to remove the autoclose.vim plugin to fix problem described here: VIM: problem with arrow keys in insert mode in mac terminal.app

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1  
check ~/.vim/bundle/autoclose or ~/.vim/plugin/autoclose.vim –  Eric Fortis Oct 3 '11 at 21:35
1  
This is for the root user, I do not see a .vim folder in my directory. –  Chris Muench Oct 4 '11 at 12:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Check :h runtimepath for a complete description of possible locations for your folder (considering you're not using a bundle plugin). Here is an excerpt:

                                *'runtimepath'* *'rtp'* *vimfiles*
'runtimepath' 'rtp'     string  (default:
                                        Unix, Mac OS X: "$HOME/.vim,
                                                $VIM/vimfiles,
                                                $VIMRUNTIME,
                                                $VIM/vimfiles/after,
                                                $HOME/.vim/after"
                                        ...
                        global
                        {not in Vi}
        This is a list of directories which will be searched for runtime
        files:
          filetype.vim  filetypes by file name |new-filetype|
          scripts.vim   filetypes by file contents |new-filetype-scripts|
          autoload/     automatically loaded scripts |autoload-functions|
          colors/       color scheme files |:colorscheme|
          compiler/     compiler files |:compiler|
          doc/          documentation |write-local-help|
          ftplugin/     filetype plugins |write-filetype-plugin|
          indent/       indent scripts |indent-expression|
          keymap/       key mapping files |mbyte-keymap|
          lang/         menu translations |:menutrans|
          menu.vim      GUI menus |menu.vim|
          plugin/       plugin scripts |write-plugin|
          print/        files for printing |postscript-print-encoding|
          spell/        spell checking files |spell|
          syntax/       syntax files |mysyntaxfile|
          tutor/        files for vimtutor |tutor|

        And any other file searched for with the |:runtime| command.

        The defaults for most systems are setup to search five locations:
        1. In your home directory, for your personal preferences.
        2. In a system-wide Vim directory, for preferences from the system
           administrator.
        3. In $VIMRUNTIME, for files distributed with Vim.
                                                        *after-directory*
        4. In the "after" directory in the system-wide Vim directory.  This is
           for the system administrator to overrule or add to the distributed
           defaults (rarely needed)
        5. In the "after" directory in your home directory.  This is for
           personal preferences to overrule or add to the distributed defaults
           or system-wide settings (rarely needed).

        ...
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You should follow Eric'comment.

That said, I have these lines in my .vimrc:

--EDIT--

I know this answer is not the chosen one but I learned something thanks to ZyX comments so here is an edit.

The lines below should be written as follow:

nnoremap <Esc>A <up>
nnoremap <Esc>B <down>
nnoremap <Esc>C <right>
nnoremap <Esc>D <left>
inoremap <Esc>A <up>
inoremap <Esc>B <down>
inoremap <Esc>C <right>
inoremap <Esc>D <left>

I'm afraid a lot of people do the exact same mistake I did: the raw escape code solution is like everywhere on the net from the Vim wiki to SO via lots of forums.

--END EDIT--

nnoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>A <up>
nnoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>B <down>
nnoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>C <right>
nnoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>D <left>
inoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>A <up>
inoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>B <down>
inoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>C <right>
inoremap <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>D <left>

and didn't need to remove any plugin.

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Don't add raw command codes into the file, you already have <...> notation and «character that looks like ^[» is expressed as <Esc>. Surprising, isn't it? Note that whenever I saw such problems <Arrow> outputted <Esc>O[A-D], not <Esc>[A-D]. –  ZyX Oct 4 '11 at 19:19
    
That's what you get when you follow blindly random forum posts. Of course I knew that ^[ meant <Esc> but I believed the two notations had different "weight" (by lack of a better word) the use of one over the other being dictated by the particular context. Thank you for the info, I'm going to try it right now. Do you have a specific reason for keeping raw command codes out of .vimrc? Beside the perfectly fine reason that we already have <...> I mean. –  romainl Oct 4 '11 at 20:40
    
Besides a bit of h/l moves inconvenience the more raw control codes you have the more is the chance that mercurial which keeps my configuration will take this file as binary (and thus won't show diffs). In addition, if you format your plugin with :TOhtml, :Format or such you will either get these characters not displayed or displayed as ^[ (and same will be copied). Don't you see by yourself: instead of writing <Esc> you wrote <type ctrl+v then Esc to obtain a single char that looks like ^[>? –  ZyX Oct 4 '11 at 20:51
    
And I can't remember how is bitbucket/github/{VCS hosting that you are using} will display these characters... but I bet you whatever they choose it won't get copied as a control code (I may be wrong though). –  ZyX Oct 4 '11 at 20:55
    
I can say about bitbucket: it displays raw escape as a rectangle (as for any unknown character) and it gets copied as an escape (so I was wrong in previous comment), but there is another inconvenience: you can't use <C-r>+ to paste escape, you need <C-r><C-r>+. It also does not get pasted from Opera (guess it is related to non-ASCII character pasting problem that was introduced when Opera switched to a self-written toolkit and vim updated to 7.3 with some more X clipboard handling strictness). –  ZyX Oct 4 '11 at 21:07

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