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There must be something I'm missing here. I have this nice, pretty Oracle SQL statement in Toad that gives me back a list of all active personnel with the IDs that I want:

SELECT PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID,
       PERSONNEL.NAME_LAST_KEY,
       PERSONNEL.NAME_FIRST_KEY,
       PA_EID.ALIAS EID,
       PA_IDTWO.ALIAS IDTWO,
       PA_LIC.ALIAS LICENSENO
  FROM PERSONNEL
       LEFT JOIN PERSONNEL_ALIAS PA_EID
          ON     PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID = PA_EID.PERSON_ID
             AND PA_EID.PERSONNEL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD = 1086
             AND PA_EID.ALIAS_POOL_CD = 3796547
             AND PERSONNEL.ACTIVE_IND = 1
       LEFT JOIN PERSONNEL_ALIAS PA_IDTWO
          ON     PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID = PA_IDTWO.PERSON_ID
             AND PA_IDTWO.PERSONNEL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD = 3839085
             AND PA_IDTWO.ACTIVE_IND = 1
       LEFT JOIN PERSONNEL_ALIAS PA_LIC
          ON     PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID = PA_LIC.PERSON_ID
             AND PA_LIC.PERSONNEL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD = 1087
             AND PA_LIC.ALIAS_POOL_CD = 683988
             AND PA_LIC.ACTIVE_IND = 1
 WHERE PERSONNEL.ACTIVE_IND = 1 AND PERSONNEL.PHYSICIAN_IND = 1;

This works very nicely. Where I run into problems is when I put it into Access. I know, I know, Access Sucks. Sometimes one needs to use it, especially if one has multiple database types that they just want to store a few queries in, and especially if one's boss only knows Access. Anyway, I was having trouble with the ANDs inside the FROM, so I moved those to the WHERE, but for some odd reason, Access isn't doing the LEFT JOINs, returning only those personnel with EID, IDTWO, and LICENSENO's. Not everybody has all three of these.

Best shot in Access so far is:

SELECT PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID, 
            PERSONNEL.NAME_LAST_KEY, 
            PERSONNEL.NAME_FIRST_KEY, 
            PA_EID.ALIAS AS EID, 
            PA_IDTWO.ALIAS AS ID2, 
            PA_LIC.ALIAS AS LICENSENO

FROM ((PERSONNEL 
        LEFT JOIN PERSONNEL_ALIAS AS PA_EID ON PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID=PA_EID.PERSON_ID) 
        LEFT JOIN PERSONNEL_ALIAS AS PA_IDTWO ON PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID=PA_IDTWO.PERSON_ID) 
        LEFT JOIN PERSONNEL_ALIAS AS PA_LIC ON PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID=PA_LIC.PERSON_ID

WHERE (((PERSONNEL.ACTIVE_IND)=1) 
        AND ((PERSONNEL.PHYSICIAN_IND)=1) 
        AND ((PA_EID.PRSNL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD)=1086) 
        AND ((PA_EID.ALIAS_POOL_CD)=3796547) 
        AND ((PA_IDTWO.PRSNL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD)=3839085) 
        AND ((PA_IDTWO.ACTIVE_IND)=1) 
        AND ((PA_LIC.PRSNL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD)=1087) 
        AND ((PA_LIC.ALIAS_POOL_CD)=683988) 
        AND ((PA_LIC.ACTIVE_IND)=1));

I think that part of the problem could be that I'm using the same alias (lookup) table for all three joins. Maybe there's a more efficient way of doing this? Still new to SQL land, so any tips as far as that goes would be great. I feel like these should be equivalent, but the Toad query gives me back many many tens of thousands of imperfect rows, and Access gives me fewer than 500. I need to find everybody so that nobody is left out. It's almost as if the LEFT JOINs aren't working at all in Access.

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Any time you test a LEFT JOINed table's column values (other than IS NULL/IS NOT NULL) in the WHERE clause, you force that join to behave as if it were an INNER JOIN. –  Joe Stefanelli Oct 3 '11 at 21:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To understand what you are doing, let's look at simplified version of your query:

SELECT PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID,    
       PA_EID.ALIAS AS EID          
FROM PERSONNEL         
LEFT JOIN PERSONNEL_ALIAS AS PA_EID ON PERSONNEL.PERSON_ID=PA_EID.PERSON_ID         
WHERE PERSONNEL.ACTIVE_IND=1       
        AND PERSONNEL.PHYSICIAN_IND=1      
        AND PA_EID.PRSNL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD=1086
        AND PA_EID.ALIAS_POOL_CD=3796547     

If the LEFT JOIN finds match, your row might look like this:

Person_ID    EID
12345        JDB

If it doesn't find a match, (disregard the WHERE clause for a second), it could look like:

Person_ID    EID
12345        NULL

When you add the WHERE clauses above, you are telling it to only find records in the PERSONNEL_ALIAS table that meet the condition, but if no records are found, then the values are considered NULL, so they will never satisfy the WHERE condition and no records will come back...

As Joe Stefanelli said in his comment, adding a WHERE clause to a LEFT JOIN'ed table make it act as an INNER JOIN instead...

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So if I were to add those WHERE conditions back into the FROM in Access, then I would get the results I wanted? I'll have to fight with the parentheses some more. Thanks! –  rev_s Oct 4 '11 at 11:10
    
Argh. No amount of parentheses make this work. I always get a "JOIN expression not supported" error in Access no matter what I do. :/ –  rev_s Oct 4 '11 at 13:36
    
OK, what I ended up doing were 3 Access queries with the ANDs I wanted in the "subquery's" WHERE statement, then LEFT JOINed them to my main PERSONNEL table. Thanks tons for the education regarding WHERE statements; I need to remember that The Access Way is different from The SQL Way. –  rev_s Oct 4 '11 at 14:26

Further to @Sparky's answer, to get the equivalent of what you're doing in Oracle, you need to filter rows from the tables on the "outer" side of the joins before you join them. One way to do this might be:

  1. For each table on the "outer" side of a join that you need to filter rows from (that is, the three instances of PERSONNEL_ALIAS), create a query that filters the rows you want. For example, the first query (say, named PA_EID) might look something like this:SELECT PERSONNEL_ALIAS.* FROM PERSONNEL_ALIAS WHERE PERSONNEL_ALIAS.PERSONNEL_ALIAS_TYPE_CD = 1086 AND PERSONNEL_ALIAS.ALIAS_POOL_CD = 3796547

  2. In your "best shot in Access so far" query in the original post: a) replace each instance of PERSONNEL_ALIAS with the corresponding query created in Step 1, and, b) remove the corresponding conditions (on PA_EID, PA_IDTWO, and PA_LIC) from the WHERE clause.

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That's pretty much what I ended up doing, but using Access's point-and-click queries. Filter out the ones that work before, then when they're joined, the ones that are blank in the subquery will end up null in the main query. Thanks! If I had 15 rep I'd upvote you. –  rev_s Oct 4 '11 at 14:29
    
I'll upvote him since he added beneficial information to the answer. –  Sparky Oct 4 '11 at 15:48
    
Thanks, @Sparky. –  Brian Camire Oct 4 '11 at 17:23

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