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C#: Public Fields versus Automatic Properties

I read properties in C# are declared or used to provide access of private members to others. In that case, when we are declaring public members, do we still have to declare properties for them.

In the following example, they have declared properties for public members. I don't know why ?

class Customer
{
     public double TotalPurchases { get; set; }
     public string Name { get; set; }
     public int CustomerID { get; set; }
}

thanks!

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marked as duplicate by Joe, Patrick Desjardins, BrokenGlass, John Saunders, Ben Voigt Oct 3 '11 at 22:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Lots of dupes on this site already on this question. Please search next time before posting! –  Joe Oct 3 '11 at 22:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This article gives you a good overview to properties and its overuse http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2006/08/properties-vs-public-variables.html

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Using properties instead of public fields allows non-breaking changes in how these properties are implemented in the next release - with public fields any change is breaking.

For example you could change the implementation of TotalPurchases to perform a calculation instead of returning the value of a backing field directly. From the point of view of the consumer of the class this change is non-breaking and does not affect how your application works.

 public double TotalPurchases
 {
   get
   {
     return CalculatePurchases();
   } 
 }
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1  
+1 The code behind the property can be changed (to use a custom private backing field or whatever). However, changing a Public Member Variable to a Property is a breaking change in the ABI (Application Binary Interface). –  user166390 Oct 3 '11 at 22:16

So first of all, properties in C# are declared for many reasons, and it's not about being private at all.

You can, for example, make the getter public and the setter private:

public double TotalPurchases 
{
   get; 
   private set;  
}

Also, for some frameworks backed up by reflection, they look for properties and not fields. In this case, properties are a must, even if it looks useless when nothing is done in the getter/setter.

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