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I'm using WebKitDotNet to simulate and automate a web browser. This is really nifty and works in most respects. However, when I try to implement this code, WebKit doesn't trigger a download:

WebKitBrowser _b = null;

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    _b = new WebKitBrowser();
    _b.DownloadBegin += new FileDownloadBeginEventHandler(b_DownloadBegin);
    _b.Error += new WebKitBrowserErrorEventHandler(_b_Error);
    _b.AllowDownloads = true;
    _b.Navigate("http://sourceforge.net/projects/webkitdotnet/files/WebKit%20.NET%200.x/0.5/WebKit.NET-0.5-bin-cairo.zip/download");
}

void _b_Error(object sender, WebKitBrowserErrorEventArgs e)
{
    MessageBox.Show("error!");
}

void b_DownloadBegin(object sender, FileDownloadBeginEventArgs e)
{
    MessageBox.Show("hi");
}

Neither the "Error" nor the "DownloadBegin" events fire. I would expect at least one of them to do so - is there a setting that I'm missing?

EDIT: I know this is an old question, but here's the update. When I wrote this question, I was trying to automate a process that required a human being - once per day - to log onto a website, provide credentials, and click a download link. We were hoping to be able to do this programmatically to relieve the monotony for the poor person tasked with doing this job.

Unfortunately, WebKitDotNet did not succeed in this task. Although, in a webkit based browser, you can click on the link and trigger a download, in the embedded WebKitDotNet clicking on the link did nothing. My guess is that something within WebKitDotNet lost the event. If anyone wants to test this, you can use the Sourceforge download link to test.

One of the guys on my team did eventually solve this problem by using an Internet Explorer automation tool called "IMacros". We selected this product because 1) We could guarantee that IE was installed on every computer that would run the program, and 2) IMacros could correctly receive the event from the website and trigger the file download.

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What if you use a direct download url: [link]downloads.sourceforge.net/project/webkitdotnet/… I guess the webkit browser isn't handling the 5 sec timeout caused by a javascript on the page properly. –  Martijn B Oct 13 '11 at 16:47
    
I checked the download page and it doesn't uses a javascript to refresh itself to the actual download url. It uses the meta http-equiv="refresh" tag. This causes the browser to refresh to the actual download url which is obviously not happening. I couldn't find any limitations mentioning this on the project's website. –  Martijn B Oct 13 '11 at 17:09
    
Actually the reason I don't use a direct download is that some sites (not sourceforge, but other sites) require complex interactions of cookies and sessions in order to permit the download. So I wrote up the test using a public domain open source site to demonstrate the problem, sorry if that wasn't clear. –  Ted Spence Oct 18 '11 at 17:41
    
My money would be on not supporting the meta http-equiv="refresh" tag. I'll send a tweet to Peter Nelson one of the authors of webkitdotnet. If I know something I will let you know. –  Martijn B Oct 18 '11 at 18:54
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On the Issue tracker there is a post date from March 24, 2011 in which is stated that download does not work yet:

https://github.com/webkitdotnet/webkitdotnet/issues/7

Since there are few issues in the tracker, it would have probably been marked as resolved if the feature was added meantime.

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I guess I'll accept this answer - I wish I could say they'd picked up the project and fixed it but oh well :) –  Ted Spence Aug 21 '12 at 15:09
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