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I have successfully used a few custom commands using MVVM-Light, but I want my application to respond to the standard ApplicationCommands, not just at a Window level, but at a detailed item level as well.

I have a TreeView that I want to be able to copy and paste nodes in. Each TreeViewItem has its own ViewModel, and they are displayed via HierarchicalDataTemplates in XAML as there are several different types. I have implemented methods to copy, paste, as well as CanCopy and CanPaste on my ViewModel classes. If appropriate, I could implement MVVM-Light RelayCommands pointing to these easily enough, but that doesn't seem right.

I would like to access the commands using a menu, Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V, or eventually a context menu. I also don't want to break copy/paste functionality for other elements in my UI, such as TextBoxes. It seems appropriate to use the built-in ApplicationCommands for this purpose. However, I am only seeing examples of these being handled in a UserControl code-behind. I don't have (or otherwise need) a UserControl, nor is that really following MVVM.

Is there a way I can bind ApplicationCommand.Copy and ApplicationCommand.Paste commands to my ViewModels, i.e., in the data templates?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have resolved this using Behaviors attached to the TreeView. The TreeViewItems or Templates to not seem to get the commands routed to them. Fortunately, the TreeView also has a SelectedItem property that can be used to get the ViewModel!

(Behaviors are conceptually similar to the solution in the link in @Natxo's answer, but it doesn't resolve everything.)

The Behavior class:

public class TreeViewClipboardBehavior : Behavior<TreeView>
{
    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        base.OnAttached();

        CommandBinding CopyCommandBinding = new CommandBinding(
            ApplicationCommands.Copy,
            CopyCommandExecuted,
            CopyCommandCanExecute);
        AssociatedObject.CommandBindings.Add(CopyCommandBinding);

        CommandBinding CutCommandBinding = new CommandBinding(
            ApplicationCommands.Cut,
            CutCommandExecuted,
            CutCommandCanExecute);
        AssociatedObject.CommandBindings.Add(CutCommandBinding);

        CommandBinding PasteCommandBinding = new CommandBinding(
            ApplicationCommands.Paste,
            PasteCommandExecuted,
            PasteCommandCanExecute);
        AssociatedObject.CommandBindings.Add(PasteCommandBinding);
    }

    private void CopyCommandExecuted(object target, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        NestingItemTreeViewModelBase item = AssociatedObject.SelectedItem as NestingItemTreeViewModelBase;
        if (item != null && item.CanCopyToClipboard)
        {
            item.CopyToClipboard();
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }

    private void CopyCommandCanExecute(object target, CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        NestingItemTreeViewModelBase item = AssociatedObject.SelectedItem as NestingItemTreeViewModelBase;
        if (item != null)
        {
            e.CanExecute = item.CanCopyToClipboard;
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }

    private void CutCommandExecuted(object target, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        NestingItemTreeViewModelBase item = AssociatedObject.SelectedItem as NestingItemTreeViewModelBase;
        if (item != null && item.CanCutToClipboard)
        {
            item.CutToClipboard();
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }

    private void CutCommandCanExecute(object target, CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        NestingItemTreeViewModelBase item = AssociatedObject.SelectedItem as NestingItemTreeViewModelBase;
        if (item != null)
        {
            e.CanExecute = item.CanCutToClipboard;
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }


    private void PasteCommandExecuted(object target, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        NestingItemTreeViewModelBase item = AssociatedObject.SelectedItem as NestingItemTreeViewModelBase;
        if (item != null && item.CanPasteFromClipboard)
        {
            item.PasteFromClipboard();
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }

    private void PasteCommandCanExecute(object target, CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        NestingItemTreeViewModelBase item = AssociatedObject.SelectedItem as NestingItemTreeViewModelBase;
        if (item != null)
        {
            e.CanExecute = item.CanPasteFromClipboard;
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }
}

The XAML

<TreeView Grid.Row="2" ItemsSource="{Binding SystemTreeRoot}">
    <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
        <local:TreeViewClipboardBehavior/>
    </i:Interaction.Behaviors>
    <TreeView.Resources>
        <HierarchicalDataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:MyViewModel}" ItemsSource="{Binding Children}">
            <!-- Template content -->
        </HierarchicalDataTemplate>
</TreeView>
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I believe that you are looking for CommandBindings. I use something similar for some textboxes:

    <DataTemplate x:Key="textBoxTemplate" >
        <TextBox>
            <TextBox.CommandBindings>
                <CommandBinding Command="ApplicationCommand.Copy" 
                                Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"
                                CanExecute="CommandBinding_CanExecute">
                </CommandBinding>
            </TextBox.CommandBindings>
        </TextBox>
    </DataTemplate>

Note that PreviewCanExecute and PreviewExecuted are also available.

Edit: Check out the sample here to make it MVVM compliant.

share|improve this answer
    
I had attempted this method, except I could not quite figure out where in my template I should include them. I was trying to get to the TreeViewItem, which is not in the XAML, and could not figure out proper syntax. I have a StackPanel at the root of my data template, so that seems a sensible location. However, this method requires a handler in the View code-behind, and does not bind to my ViewModels, which are the DataContext of the template. In any case, this is a viable solution path, even if it is not pure MVVM. Thanks! –  mbmcavoy Oct 4 '11 at 16:22
    
Mmmh, you're right. I've edited to show a good way to avoid VM related coding in the View. With this, i guess tou only need to know how to use in your template. –  Natxo Oct 5 '11 at 9:33

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