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When doing calculations in Mathematica I often need to redefine a function by appending to it. For example if I define

f[n_] := n^2 + n + 1

then after some time I'd like to add 2n^3 so from now on

f[n] = 2n^3 + n^2 + n + 1. 

Then I'd like to add Sin[n] and going further

f[n] = 2n^3 + n^2 + n + 1 + Sin[n]. 

And so on.

It's easy to do with variables, for example x += 2. Is there something similar for functions?…

Edited to add – yes, I was doing that to semi-manually find a function that fits data the best. I know there are functions to do that but I wanted to see if I can get there myself. I did that but the way was not elegant so that prompted this question.

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It would really help to know what the criterion is that causes you to want to add a term. Is it that different definitions apply for different values of n? –  Verbeia Oct 4 '11 at 5:48
    
@Verbeia It looks like the OP just tries to select a combination of base functions which is appropriate for fitting some experimental data within experimental errors. Probably it is a homework. –  Alexey Popkov Oct 4 '11 at 6:46
    
@AlexeyPopkov - true, but why mix up polynominal and trigonometric basis functions? I am a simple economist but it just looks odd to me. –  Verbeia Oct 4 '11 at 6:48
1  
@Verbeia If it is known that experimental data contain (or may contain) both periodical and non-periodical components, it is quite logical to use a combination of polynomial and trigonometric function for fitting. –  Alexey Popkov Oct 4 '11 at 7:52
1  
@Alexey just in case you are still doing that by hand :) creativemachines.cornell.edu/eureqa –  belisarius Oct 4 '11 at 12:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can define a list of your basis functions and then just pick up needed number of elements:

fList = {n^2, n, 1, 2 n^3, Sin[n]}; 

f[n_] = Total[Take[fList, 3]]
f[n_] = Total[Take[fList, 4]]
f[n_] = Total[Take[fList, 5]]
(*
=> 1 + n + n^2
=> 1 + n + n^2 + 2 n^3
=> 1 + n + n^2 + 2 n^3 + Sin[n]
*)
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I think this works best for my needs, as I can append to the list if needed. Thanks! –  Dunda Oct 4 '11 at 10:14

A late-to-the-party solution: the code below uses an auxiliary function, and to add a term for all subsequent uses, you just have to call a function once, with a second parameter being a pure function expressing the term you want to add:

ClearAll[f];
Module[{g},
 g[n_] := n^2 + n + 1;
 f[n_, add_: Automatic] /; add === Automatic := g[n];
 f[n_, add_: Automatic] := Block[{m}, g[m] = g[m] + add[m]; g[n]];
]

Examples of use:

In[43]:= f[m]
Out[43]= 1 + m + m^2

In[44]:= f[m, 2 #^3 &]
Out[44]= 1 + m + m^2 + 2 m^3

In[45]:= f[m]
Out[45]= 1 + m + m^2 + 2 m^3

In[46]:= f[m, Sin]
Out[46]= 1 + m + m^2 + 2 m^3 + Sin[m]

In[47]:= f[m]
Out[47]= 1 + m + m^2 + 2 m^3 + Sin[m]

With this approach, you should be careful though to call the two-argument form only once, when you want to add the term to the function - or it will be added every time you call.

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+1, I'm not surprised that you came up with a simple, clever solution for this. –  rcollyer Oct 4 '11 at 12:39
1  
@rcollyer Took me a while. Actually, IMO this one is more a design problem. Thanks for the upvote. –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 4 '11 at 13:07

There are many subtleties craving under your question. Monster subtleties, I mean.

I'll not enter the meander, but you may do something like:

f[n] = n^2;
f[n] = f[n] + 2
(* but for evaluation *)
f[n] /. n -> 2

So, for example for plotting this:

Plot[f[n] /. n -> x, {x, 0, 1}, AxesOrigin -> {0, 0}, 
                                PlotLabel  -> Framed@f[n]]

enter image description here

However, you should NOT do this. Read more about delayed definition!

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It really depends why you need to redefine your function f. If the reason is that you realised the previous definition was wrong, then by all means just go back to the cell in question, edit it and re-evaluate it to re-define f.

f[n_] := n^2 + n + 1

Becomes

f[n_] := 2n^3 + n^2 + n + 1 

Note the := syntax and the underscore.

If, instead, you want f to take the first definition for, say n<=100 and the second for n>100, you would use the Condition syntax /;, as shown below.

f[n_] := n^2 + n + 1 /; n<=100
f[n_] := 2n^3 + n^2 + n + 1 /; n>100
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This works, but requires separate functions. Generalising the append function is not so easy.

Clear[f]
AppendToFunction := (
   a = DownValues[f];
   b = Append[a[[1, 2]], 2 n^3];
   f[n_] = Evaluate[b]);

AppendSinToFunction := (
   a = DownValues[f];
   b = Append[a[[1, 2]], Sin[n]];
   f[n_] = Evaluate[b]);

f[n_] := n^2 + n + 1;
f[3] == 9 + 4
DownValues[f]

(* 
->True
->{HoldPattern[f[n_]]:>n^2+n+1}
*)

AppendToFunction
f[3] == 9 + 4 + 54
DownValues[f]

(*
->1+n+n^2+2 n^3
->True
->{HoldPattern[f[n_]]:>1+n+n^2+2 n^3}
*)

AppendSinToFunction
f[3] == 9 + 4 + 54 + Sin[3]
DownValues[f]

(*
->1+n+n^2+2 n^3+Sin[n]
->True
->{HoldPattern[f[n_]]:>1+n+n^2+2 n^3+Sin[n]}
*)
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