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I am trying to check a string for certain characters. The characters are basically in a list. However, I don't know how to achieve this. The only idea I have is to loop through the string, checking the first character of the string against each character. For example, if my string is: "ablacablada", and the characters I want to check for are (l, d, e, f, h, p), I would check the index 0 in the "ablacablada" string. I would loop through the character list and see if the character at index 0 is "l". If not, I would move on to index 1, and so on. Here's my code:

public boolean stringChecker()
{
  String newString = "ablacablada";
  char [] newChar = {l; d; e; f; h; p};
  String charString = new String(newChar)
  boolean isString = false;

  for (int i=0; i<charString.length(); i++)
  {
    for (int j=0; j<newString; j++)
    {
      if(charString.charAt(i) == newString.charAt(j))
      {
         isString = true; // a character in the list (l, d, e, f, h, p) is detected
      }
      else
      {
         isString = false;
      }
    }
  }
  return isString;
} 

That's my idea. However, it doesn't work. If anyone could point me in the right direction, I'd be grateful. Thanks in advance.

P.S. Here's what I mean:

"a b l a c a b l a d a"

1. check the a from the character list. 
Is "a" == "l"? No. 
Is "a" == "d"? No. 
Is "a" == "e"? No. 
Is "a" == "f"? No. 
Is "a" == "h"? No. 
Is "a" == "p"? No.

2. Move on to index 1. 
Is "b" == "l"? No. 
Is "b" == "d"? No. 
Is "b" == "d"? No... 
And so on. 
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1  
Regular Expression is designed for this. [ldefhp] –  Joe Oct 4 '11 at 1:49
    
You could also check newString.indexOf() for each letter –  Jim Oct 4 '11 at 1:53
    
I don't want to deal with regular expressions, sorry :). I don't know them at all. –  Macosx Iam Oct 4 '11 at 1:55

2 Answers 2

j should be compared to the length of newString
You are setting isString to false after you may have already set it to true.

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The boolean expression, I believe, is correct. Although it is set to false initially, that is just to initialize the boolean expression. Afterwards, I can change it to true and false whenever I want. –  Macosx Iam Oct 4 '11 at 1:55
    
@Macosx Iam - the isString you return is the result of comparing the last character in your array to the last character in your string. –  Stephen Denne Oct 4 '11 at 2:00
    
Yes, and I want the character array to loop through and check each index in the string. I'll provide a clearer example next to my code up top. –  Macosx Iam Oct 4 '11 at 2:05
    
@Macosx Iam - continuing your example, eventually you say that "no, 'a' is not equal to 'p', and that is your final answer. You need to stop looking once you find what you are looking for. –  Stephen Denne Oct 4 '11 at 2:15

Here's an example using Regular Expressions:

            Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[ldefhp]");
            // Split input with the pattern
            Matcher m = p.matcher("asdnbllksksksdf");
            boolean result = m.find();
            System.out.println(result); // true


edit no regexp. Return/Exit once you find your needle:

  String newString = "ablacablada";
  char [] newChar = {l; d; e; f; h; p};
  String charString = new String(newChar)
  boolean isString = false;

  for (int i=0; i<charString.length(); i++)
  {
    for (int j=0; j<newString; j++)
    {
      if(charString.charAt(i) == newString.charAt(j))
      {
         return true; // a character in the list (l, d, e, f, h, p) is detected
      }
    }
  }
  return false;
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