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How should you safely create and free multiple objects?

Basically, this sort of thing:

  newOrderSource := TWebNewOrderSource.Create();
  twData := TTWData.Create();
  webData := TWebData.Create();

  try
    //do stuff
  finally
    newOrderSource.Free();
    twData.Free();
    webData.Free();
  end;

In this case, the second and third create commands aren't safe, as they work with a database. Should I just put all the Creates in the try block and check if they are assigned before I call free on them?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can do this with one try block if you assign nil to the variables first like,

newOrderSource := nil;
twData := nil;
webData := nil;
try
  newOrderSource := TWebNewOrderSource.Create();    
  twData := TTWData.Create();    
  webData := TWebData.Create();    

  //do stuff    
finally    
  webData.Free();    
  twData.Free();    
  newOrderSource.Free();    
end;    

This works because Free() checks Self for nil.

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I was posting a very similar answer, one minor change would be to put newOrderSource := TWebNewOrderSource.Create(); before the try, and ditch the newOrderSource := nil;. –  Gerry Coll Oct 4 '11 at 5:43
2  
That works too and removes one unneeded assignment but I favored simplicity and consistency in this case because it is highly unlikely saving the assignment would make much a difference if "do stuff" calls into a database. –  chuckj Oct 4 '11 at 6:07
6  
I use this all the time but regarding to safety, you should note that, compared to OP's original code, this protects you from exceptions raised in any one constructor but not from exceptions raised while freeing the objects. If you are paranoïd about that, your only option is to have as many try/finally's as there are objects (or have them implement interfaces and let them go out of scope). –  Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 4 '11 at 6:18
    
You are right! I will fix that. That is what I get for just cutting a pasting... –  chuckj Oct 4 '11 at 6:37
1  
@Leonardo Free is not a virtual method so the compiler generates a normal function call passing Self as a parameter. It is just like passing nil as the first parameter of a procedure that takes TObject, it just looks a bit funky. –  chuckj Oct 5 '11 at 23:41

As I'm sure everyone knows, the standard way to manage an object is like this:

A := TMyObject.Create;
try
  A.DoSomething;
finally
  A.Free;
end;

If there is an exception in TMyObject.Create then the destructor will be called and then the exception raised. In that case A will not be assigned to.

When you have multiple objects you can repeat the pattern:

A := TMyObject.Create;
try
  B := TMyObject.Create;
  try
    A.DoSomething;
    B.DoSomething;
  finally
    B.Free;
  end;
finally
  A.Free;
end;

This very quickly becomes a mess and hence the question.

A standard trick is to take advantage of the fact that Free can safely be called on a nil object reference.

A := nil;
B := nil;
try
  A := TMyObject.Create;
  B := TMyObject.Create;
  A.DoSomething;
  B.DoSomething;
finally
  B.Free;
  A.Free;
end;

This does have the minor weakness that it is not resilient to exceptions being raised in B.Free but it is not unreasonable to regard this as a failure condition that can be ignored. Destructors should not raise exceptions. If they do then your system is probably broken irredeemably.

This pattern above can become a little messy as more objects are added so I personally use the following helper methods.

procedure InitialiseNil(var Obj1); overload;
procedure InitialiseNil(var Obj1, Obj2); overload;
procedure InitialiseNil(var Obj1, Obj2, Obj3); overload;

procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1); overload;
procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1, Obj2); overload;
procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1, Obj2, Obj3); overload;

In fact my code has versions with even more parameters. For ease of maintenance this code is all automatically generated from a short Python script.

These methods are implemented in the obvious way, e.g.

procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1, Obj2);
var
  Temp1, Temp2: TObject;
begin
  Temp1 := TObject(Obj1);
  Temp2 := TObject(Obj2);
  Pointer(Obj1) := nil;
  Pointer(Obj2) := nil;
  Temp1.Free;
  Temp2.Free;
end;

This allows us to re-write the sample above like this:

InitialiseNil(A, B);
try
  A := TMyObject.Create;
  B := TMyObject.Create;
  A.DoSomething;
  B.DoSomething;
finally
  FreeAndNil(B, A);
end;
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Couldn't you have your helper methods receive an array of values so you could pass an arbitrary number of objects to them? –  Jerry Gagnon Oct 4 '11 at 11:15
    
@Jerry That would work too but I preferred not to use open array syntax at this point. My reasoning is that these functions are written once and never modified. So I care less about duplication than I would in living code that is modified. The motivation is so that the calling code is cleaner and that is the code that gets modified. –  David Heffernan Oct 4 '11 at 11:28

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