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In C++ - take a case where derived class deriving from a base class and there is a virtual method in base class which the derived class is overriding. Could someone tell me a real life scenario where the derived class version of the virtual function might require to call the base class version of the virtual function?

Example,

class Base
{
public:
    Base() {}
    virtual ~Base() {}
    virtual void display() { cout << "Base version" << endl; }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived() {}
    virtual ~Derived() {}
    void display();
};

void Derived::display()
{
    Base::display();  // a scenario which would require to call like this?
    cout << "Derived version" << endl;
}
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7  
Any case where the derived class is extending the functionality of the base class, so instead of duplicating what the base is doing you'd call it and then perform additional steps in the derived class. –  Praetorian Oct 4 '11 at 6:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You do that every time when you also need base class behavior but don't want (or can't) reimplement it.

One common example is serialization:

void Derived::Serialize( Container& where )
{
    Base::Serialize( where );
    // now serialize Derived fields

}

you don't care how base class is serialized, but you definitely want it to serialize (otherwise you lose some data), so you call the base class method.

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You can find lots of real-life examples in MFC. For. e.g

CSomeDialog::OnInitDialog()
{
  CDialogEx::OnInitDialog(); //The base class function is called.
  ----
  ----- 
}
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Yes, sometimes this is done in serialization:

class A{
   int x;
public:
   A () : x(0) {}
   virtual void out( Output* o )
   {
      o->write(x);
   }
   virtual void in( Input* i )
   {
      o->read(&x);
   }
}

class B : public A{
   int y;
public:
   B () : y(0) {}
   virtual void out( Output* o )
   {
      A::out(o);
      o->write(y);
   }
   virtual void in( Input* i )
   {
      A::in(i);
      i->read(&y);
   }
}

This is done because you want to read/write data both for the parent class as well as for your derived class.

This is a real-life example as to when the derived class must also call the base class functionality as well as add something more to it.

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In an implementation of the GoF State Pattern , when a substate has an exit() function and the superstate has too. You are required to execute the substate exit() first, then the superstate's

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The simplest I could have think of is the implementation of qt classes. Since you wanted a real example, take a look into qt events handler

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