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This question already has an answer here:

I have the Parent Class :

class clsTestParent
    {
        protected int x;

        public void Foo()
        {
            x = 10;
        }

    }

I have the Derrived Class as below:

class clsDerivedTest : clsTestParent
    {

            x = 10;
            Foo();

    }

But this is not working as I am getting following two errors:

Invalid token '=' in class, struct, or interface member declaration
Method must have a return type

But the above statements works fine when I try to use them with a method in derived class as below:

 class clsDerivedTest : clsTestParent
    {


        public void myTestMethod()
        {
            x = 10;
            Foo();
        }
}

Why the protected var or methods are only accessible by using derived class methods but not direcly in the class.

I even tried accessing the Protected member by creating object as below:

clsDerivedTest objDerivedTest = new clsDerivedTest();
            objDerivedTest.x = 10;

But again getting error for Protection Level. I have the var as protected so why the object of derived class can not access it?

I need to clear my fundamentals of OOPs but stuck here.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by nawfal, George Duckett, Rikesh, dmck, mizo May 21 '13 at 13:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You know your problem - I need to clear my fundamentals of OOPs but stuck here.

Clear the concept of protected member:

The protected keyword is a member access modifier. A protected member is accessible from within the class in which it is declared, and from within any class derived from the class that declared this member.

class A 
{
   protected int x = 123;
}

class B : A 
{
   void F() 
   {
      A a = new A();  
      B b = new B();  
      a.x = 10;   // Error
      b.x = 10;   // OK
   }
}

Also, it will be good if you go through C# language specification. It will make your understanding clear.

share|improve this answer

Well, method bodies is the only place where code can be executed, apart from initialisers. Your statement x = 10; is an assignment expression that should go in a method body.

So, this would work at the class level:

int x = 10;

because it is a field declaration plus initialiser. But a simple assignment statement does not work. Think of it this way: if you placed x = 10; in the middle of your class body, outside every method, when would it run? There would be no way to "invoke" it.

Create a method for it or put your assignment in the class constructor if you want it to run on object construction.

share|improve this answer
    
You forgot to mention that this way the base field is overriden. – Yves M. Oct 4 '11 at 7:45
    
@YvesM.: What way is it overriden? I am not suggesting that a new field is added; what I am suggesting is that the OP should "Create a method for it or put your assignment in the class constructor if you want it to run on object construction". – CesarGon Oct 4 '11 at 7:47
    
If you but this code int x = 10; in the derived class... – Yves M. Oct 4 '11 at 7:53
    
@YvesM.: But that's not what I am saying in my answer. – CesarGon Oct 4 '11 at 19:18

"Why the protected var or methods are only accessible by using derived class methods but not direcly in the class." What you are trying to do is to add code in the class body directly. This is not working. And there is now OO-language that allows this.

To initialize x to 10 you might use the constructor of the class...

class clsDerivedTest : clsTestParent     
{           
    public clsDerivedTest()         
    {             
        x = 10;             
    } 
}
share|improve this answer

You can't call a function in class body in c#.

share|improve this answer
1  
I guess you mean can't? – Yves M. Oct 4 '11 at 7:39
    
Damned mobile, yes:) thanks. – Tigran Oct 4 '11 at 7:39
    
Corrected ;-) ... – Yves M. Oct 4 '11 at 7:40

Everything goes into method body, except for some declarations of variables. Calling a method goes into method body. When you have more than one class, the communication between them happens by using methods.

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