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I'm very much a beginner and have put together some JavaScript to control a pair of radio buttons which essentially behave as links.

I'm doing this as sort of a self-initiated project, or bit of fun. I know I don't have to use radio buttons, but it's something I just wanted to do.

It simply checks the radio button when you hover over it, and at the same time highlights the accompanying text. Or, highlights the text when hovered over, and also checks the accompanying radio button.

When the cursor moves out, no longer hovering over, the elements go back to their normal states.

I feel like there has to be a much cleaner way of implementing this.

Here is my mark up of the two radio buttons:

<form name=links>
    <div id="aaa">
        <input type="radio" name="fb" onMouseOut="out_event_01()" onMouseOver="over_event_01()" />
        <br /><span class="sl" id="fb_link" onMouseOut="out_event_03()" onMouseOver="over_event_03()">Button1</span>
    </div>
    <div id="bbb">
        <input type="radio" name="tw" onMouseOut="out_event_02()" onMouseOver="over_event_02()" />
        <br /><span class="sl" id="tw_link" onMouseOut="out_event_04()" onMouseOver="over_event_04()">Button2</span>
    </div>
</form>

As you can see I have a lot of onMouseOut and onMouseOver events.

This is the javascript I'm using:

function over_event_01()
{
var links = document.links.fb;
links.checked = true;
document.getElementById('fb_link').style.color = 'black';
}
function out_event_01()
{
var links = document.links.fb;
links.checked = false;
document.getElementById('fb_link').style.color = 'rgb(153,153,153)';
}
function over_event_02()
{
var links = document.links.tw;
links.checked = true;
document.getElementById('tw_link').style.color = 'black';
}
function out_event_02()
{
var links = document.links.tw;
links.checked = false;
document.getElementById('tw_link').style.color = 'rgb(153,153,153)';
}
function over_event_03()
{
var links = document.links.fb;
links.checked = true;
document.getElementById('fb_link').style.color = 'black';
}
function out_event_03()
{
var links = document.links.fb;
links.checked = false;
document.getElementById('fb_link').style.color = 'rgb(153,153,153)';
}
function over_event_04()
{
var links = document.links.tw;
links.checked = true;
document.getElementById('tw_link').style.color = 'black';
}
function out_event_04()
{
var links = document.links.tw;
links.checked = false;
document.getElementById('tw_link').style.color = 'rgb(153,153,153)';
}

Thank you for your help and suggestions.

share|improve this question
6  
Better posted on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Ray Toal Oct 4 '11 at 8:12
    
thanks, i'll give that a go. –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:14
    
what exactly are you trying to do ? with your code you can never select any of the radio boxes.. (it will always be de-selected when you mouse out) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Oct 4 '11 at 8:17
    
I just wanted them to function as a typical link. Eg. when you hover over a text link it will change colour. So I wanted the radio button to do something similar: have them checked on hover, and then un-check when not hovering. On click they will open a link of some sort. –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:23
    
+1 Ray Toal, didn't know that one existed! –  Danjah Oct 4 '11 at 9:21
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closed as off topic by Juhana, Andy E, Quentin, ThinkingStiff, bfavaretto Feb 20 '13 at 1:22

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6 Answers

I recommend you use tools and Javascript libraries like jQuery, MooTools, Dojo, ...

They are "Write less do more" libraries and you can reduce lines of your code by them.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your help, they look very helpful. cheers –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:15
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Go to http://microjs.com/ and select the appropriate tool for what you want to do

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Wow, that is awesome! Thanks –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:27
    
I really do like this one. –  julkiewicz Oct 4 '11 at 8:50
add comment
  1. A safer style in Javascript is to begin braces right after the function argument parantheis ( refer to Douglas Crockfords sessions ). This infact is a good practice for all blocks. The return statement for sure breaks if the block does not start right after the return statement. it would return undefined.

  2. Initial styling can be done using CSS

  3. bulk changes can be made using a class assignement using javascript on an event.

  4. The event hooking can be done using javascript rather than putting them in html.

  5. A library like jQuery would make the script look tidy.

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers, very helpful pointers –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:30
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  1. Use jQuery or some other similar Javascript library. Don't use DOM tree directly. You will likely end up with code that isn't cross-browser. Learning a library like that requires some additional learning, but it's so much worth it.

  2. Use CSS classes, don't manipulate on style properties unless you absolutely have to (in this case - you don't have to). Instead of changing element styles, change their classes. Keep as much as you can in you CSS-es.

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking the same thing when it comes to css classes for changing the colour of the links. I just wasn't sure how to implement it with what I am trying to achieve. –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:18
    
You can dynamically add and remove elements from "class" attribute. This is especially easy in jQuery (and other libraries of that kind). –  julkiewicz Oct 4 '11 at 8:47
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First step here, I think, is to re-use your code: you want a single rollover function, and a single rollout function, and for each element to self-identify itself to the function called.

Secondly, you probably want to unify (and make semantic) the relationship between the text labels and the radio inputs.

So... we end up with something like:

<label onMouseOut="jakryout(this)" onMouseOver="jakryover(this)"><input type="radio" name="fb1" />Button1</label>
<label onMouseOut="jakryout(this)" onMouseOver="jakryover(this)"><input type="radio" name="fb2" />Button2</label>
<label onMouseOut="jakryout(this)" onMouseOver="jakryover(this)"><input type="radio" name="fb3" />Button3</label>

and

function jakryover (element){
    element.style.color = "#f00";
    element.firstChild.checked = true;
}

function jakryout (element){
    element.style.color = "#00f";
    element.firstChild.checked = false;
}

There's more you could do to make this even simpler, but this would be a good start.

EDIT

And here's the abstract CSS approach:

function jakryover (element){
    element.classList.add("overclass");
    element.firstChild.checked = true;
}
function jakryout (element){
    element.classList.remove("overclass");
    element.firstChild.checked = false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks heaps, that will no doubt simplify stuff –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:54
    
I got this working. Thank you, it cleans up a lot of the code. Is there a way to actually target the style in css, rather than use style in the javascript? –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 23:28
    
Good. Yes. And, yes, that's certainly adds another layer of cleanliness to it. I'll edit the answer shortly. –  graphicdivine Oct 5 '11 at 7:42
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I havent tried in a browser but you could make the mouse-events a little bit more generic by using the parent as an input parameter and use the cild elements from it.

I propose that you use something like jQuery to make your life easier on coding javascript. To play around with frameworks you might try http://jsfiddle.net/ to get you started...

function mouseEvent(container) 
{ 
container[0].checked = ! container[0].checked; 
    if (links.checked == true)
    {
        container[2].style.color = 'black'; 
    } 
    else
    {
        container[2].style.color = 'rgb(153,153,153)';
    }
}


<div id="aaa" onMouseOut="mouseEvent(this)" onMouseOver="mouseEvent(this)">         
    <input type="radio" name="fb" /><br />
    <span class="sl" id="fb_link">Button1</span>
</div> 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I will definitely play around wit this. Seems a lot cleaner. –  jakry001 Oct 4 '11 at 8:26
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