Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently came accross a C++ code like the following:

if(test_1)
    if(test_2)
    {
         // Do stuff
    }
    else
       exit(0);

This is ambiguous, since the compiler could see this as:

if(test_1)
{
    if(test_2)
    {
    }
    else
    {
    }
}

or as:

if(test_1)
{
    if(test_2)
    {
    }
}
else
{
}

Is the behaviour of this code defined according to any standard (C, C++)? I saw this code in a C++ program on VC++, which seems to prefered the first solution.

share|improve this question
2  
That is not ambiguous as the standard determines how it has to be parsed, it might look ambiguous to you, but it is not to the compiler or other programmers that know how it is parsed. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 4 '11 at 8:20
1  
You might want to read this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dangling_else and this: drdobbs.com/blogs/cpp/231602010. –  sbi Oct 4 '11 at 8:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Is the behaviour of this code defined according to any standard (C, C++)?

Yes, it is defined. In C (and all similar languages as I know), the "dangling else" binds to the last free if, therefore this interpretation

if(test_1)
{
    if(test_2)
    {
    }
    else
    {
    }
}

is correct.

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 But as a note (to the OP), many consider good writing style to ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS put braces for this (and other) reasons. Not for the compiler ambiguity (non-existant) but for human ambiguity and stupidity. –  xanatos Oct 4 '11 at 8:40

There is no ambiguity. The else clause always refers to the closest if it can be attached to. From the C++ standard (6.4 Selection statements):

In clause 6, the term substatement refers to the contained statement or statements that appear in the syntax notation. The substatement in a selection-statement (each substatement, in the else form of the if statement) implicitly defines a local scope (3.3).

If the substatement in a selection-statement is a single statement and not a compound-statement, it is as if it was rewritten to be a compound-statement containing the original substatement. [ Example:

   if (x) int i;

can be equivalently rewritten as

     if (x) { 
           int i;
     }

It ensues that the code you wrote can be rewritten as:

if(test_1)
{
    if(test_2)
    {
        // Do stuff
    }
    else
    {
        exit(0);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

It is well defined. else is always paired with the nearest available if.

share|improve this answer

It is Defined in C. An else always gets paired with nearest if; therefore you should use proper braces to avoid ambiguity.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.