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I have an event driven system that responds to trades as follows

def onTrade {

    if (price > threshold) {
        processReject()
        return
    } 

    if (volume > threshold) {
        processReject()
        return
    } 
    .
    .
    .
}

I thought I could improve things syntactically by defining an inner method

def onTrade {

    def filterRemove = (filter: Boolean) => {
        if (filter) {
            processReject()
        }
        filter
    }

    val filters = List(
        filterRemove(price > threshold),
        filterRemove(volume > threshold),...
    )

    if (filters.filter(x => x == true).size > 0) return

}

The syntax is cleaner especially as the number of filters increases. The one issue I'm having is that the code wastes unnecessary clock cycles by going through every single test rather than returning on the first fail. Is this some way around this? For example exiting onTrade as soon as filterRemove returns false. If there is a more expressive way to do this I would love to know that as well.

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Have a look at this article: debasishg.blogspot.com/2010/12/… It covers the same domain and very similar problem. –  CheatEx Oct 4 '11 at 12:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that you have a list of booleans -- they have all been processed already. You need to delay that. For example:

def onTrade {

    // now filterRemove returns Function0[Boolean]
    // also, filter is passed by-name, so it isn't 
    // processed until you call the Function0
    def filterRemove(filter: => Boolean) = () => {
        if (filter) {
            processReject()
            true
        } else false
    }

    // This won't process anything, just accumulate Function0's
    val filters = List(
        filterRemove(price > threshold),
        filterRemove(volume > threshold),...
    )

    // And we use "exists", which returns on the first true value
    if (filters.exists(x => x)) return

}
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You can for example maintain a list of conditions for rejection. Then you can call them in sequence with exists. As soon as a condition is false, the iteration ends.

Here is a small example:

val conditions: List[() => Boolean] =
  List(
    () => price > threshold1,
    () => volume > threshold2
  )

def checkAndReject() = {
  val filter = conditions.exists( _() )
  if( filter ) processReject()
  filter
}
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If you are just going to write the conditions in places, what not simply using an or? It is properly semi strict

if (
  price > threshold1
  || volume > threshold2
  || ...
) {
   processReject()
   return
}
... proceed
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This is what I thought of too. Except I would have an else clause following on, instead of the return, as it's not generally a good idea to have returns in the middle of a method. –  Luigi Plinge Oct 4 '11 at 15:34

This is not a very functional or idiomatic style, but may be of interest:

def onTrade {
    val reject = () => {
        processReject()
        return
    }

    // ...

    if (price > threshold) reject()

    // ...

    if (volume > threshold) reject()

    // ...

}
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I guess one could even turn reject into a lazy val... –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Oct 4 '11 at 11:35

If there are not too many thresholds to check, I would do as follows:

def process(price:Int, volume:Int) = (price, volume) match {
   case (x:Int, y:Int) if x > threshold1 || y > threshold2 => println ("reject")
   case _ =>
}

test as follows:

def threshold1 = 10
def threshold2:Int = throw new Exception // redefine to throw exception
def process(price:Int, volume:Int) = (price, volume) match {
   case (x:Int, y:Int) if x > threshold1 || y > threshold2 => println ("reject")
   case _ =>
}

process(12, 22)
process(5, 22) 
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