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Consider a single memory access (a single read or a single write, not read+write) SSE instruction on an x86 CPU. The instruction is accessing 16 bytes (128 bits) of memory and the accessed memory location is aligned to 16 bytes.

The document "Intel® 64 Architecture Memory Ordering White Paper" states that for "Instructions that read or write a quadword (8 bytes) whose address is aligned on an 8 byte boundary" the memory operation appears to execute as a single memory access regardless of memory type.

The question: Do there exist Intel/AMD/etc x86 CPUs which guarantee that reading or writing 16 bytes (128 bits) aligned to 16 byte boundary executes as a single memory access? Is so, which particular type of CPU is it (Core2/Atom/K8/Phenom/...)? If you provide an answer (yes/no) to this question, please also specify the method that was used to determine the answer - PDF document lookup, brute force testing, math proof, or whatever other method you used to determine the answer.

This question relates to problems such as http://research.swtch.com/2010/02/off-to-races.html


Update:

I created a simple test program in C that you can run on your computers. Please compile and run it on your Phenom, Athlon, Bobcat, Core2, Atom, Sandy Bridge or whatever SSE2-capable CPU you happen to have. Thanks.

// Compile with:
//   gcc -o a a.c -pthread -msse2 -std=c99 -Wall -O2
//
// Make sure you have at least two physical CPU cores or hyper-threading.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <emmintrin.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef int v4si __attribute__ ((vector_size (16)));
volatile v4si x;

unsigned n1[16] __attribute__((aligned(64)));
unsigned n2[16] __attribute__((aligned(64)));

void* thread1(void *arg) {
        for (int i=0; i<100*1000*1000; i++) {
                int mask = _mm_movemask_ps((__m128)x);
                n1[mask]++;

                x = (v4si){0,0,0,0};
        }
        return NULL;
}

void* thread2(void *arg) {
        for (int i=0; i<100*1000*1000; i++) {
                int mask = _mm_movemask_ps((__m128)x);
                n2[mask]++;

                x = (v4si){-1,-1,-1,-1};
        }
        return NULL;
}

int main() {
        // Check memory alignment
        if ( (((uintptr_t)&x) & 0x0f) != 0 )
                abort();

        memset(n1, 0, sizeof(n1));
        memset(n2, 0, sizeof(n2));

        pthread_t t1, t2;
        pthread_create(&t1, NULL, thread1, NULL);
        pthread_create(&t2, NULL, thread2, NULL);
        pthread_join(t1, NULL);
        pthread_join(t2, NULL);

        for (unsigned i=0; i<16; i++) {
                for (int j=3; j>=0; j--)
                        printf("%d", (i>>j)&1);

                printf("  %10u %10u", n1[i], n2[i]);
                if(i>0 && i<0x0f) {
                        if(n1[i] || n2[i])
                                printf("  Not a single memory access!");
                }

                printf("\n");
        }

        return 0;
}

The CPU I have in my notebook is Core Duo (not Core2). This particular CPU fails the test, it implements 16-byte memory read/writes with a granularity of 8 bytes. The output is:

0000    96905702      10512
0001           0          0
0010           0          0
0011          22      12924  Not a single memory access!
0100           0          0
0101           0          0
0110           0          0
0111           0          0
1000           0          0
1001           0          0
1010           0          0
1011           0          0
1100     3092557       1175  Not a single memory access!
1101           0          0
1110           0          0
1111        1719   99975389
share|improve this question
    
Really? And what do you think will happen when you install only 1 memory module in a Core2 motherboard? If you happen to have a Core2 CPU (or other "modern" x86-64 CPU), try installing only 1 memory module in your machine, actually run the test program I provided, and then please post your results. Thanks. –  Atom Oct 5 '11 at 10:46
4  
To clarify the text I wrote in the comment which starts with "Really? ...". The comment was a response to a previous message from a person who believed that my StackOverflow question is related to FSB or DRAM. In a way, it is somewhat related to FSB and DRAM, but the relationship of my question to FSB and DRAM is insignificant and does not play a major role. ... The person then deleted his/her own answer and comments, thus effectively erasing them from the historical record. But, if you delete yourself from history, who will be able to remember you? Nobody. –  Atom Oct 5 '11 at 11:20
    
That's a really interesting discussion, thanks! It raises a question though: if 8 bytes is the maximum size of atomic memory accesses, does that mean that 80-bit extended floats are non-atomic? –  Jens Jan 24 at 1:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

In the Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Developer's Manual: Vol. 3A, which nowadays contains the specifications of the memory ordering white paper you mention, it is said in section 8.2.3.1, as you note yourself, that

The Intel-64 memory ordering model guarantees that, for each of the following 
memory-access instructions, the constituent memory operation appears to execute 
as a single memory access:

• Instructions that read or write a single byte.
• Instructions that read or write a word (2 bytes) whose address is aligned on a 2
byte boundary.
• Instructions that read or write a doubleword (4 bytes) whose address is aligned
on a 4 byte boundary.
• Instructions that read or write a quadword (8 bytes) whose address is aligned on
an 8 byte boundary.

Any locked instruction (either the XCHG instruction or another read-modify-write
 instruction with a LOCK prefix) appears to execute as an indivisible and 
uninterruptible sequence of load(s) followed by store(s) regardless of alignment.

Now, since the above list does NOT contain the same language for double quadword (16 bytes), it follows that the architecture does NOT guarantee that instructions which access 16 bytes of memory are atomic.

That being said, the last paragraph does hint at a way out, namely the CMPXCHG16B instruction with the LOCK prefix. You can use the CPUID instruction to figure out if your processor supports CMPXCHG16B (the "CX16" feature bit).

In the corresponding AMD document, AMD64 Technology AMD64 Architecture Programmer’s Manual Volume 2: System Programming, I can't find similar clear language.

EDIT: Test program results

(Test program modified to increase #iterations by a factor of 10)

On a Xeon X3450 (x86-64):

0000   999998139       1572
0001           0          0
0010           0          0
0011           0          0
0100           0          0
0101           0          0
0110           0          0
0111           0          0
1000           0          0
1001           0          0
1010           0          0
1011           0          0
1100           0          0
1101           0          0
1110           0          0
1111        1861  999998428

On a Xeon 5150 (32-bit):

0000   999243100     283087
0001           0          0
0010           0          0
0011           0          0
0100           0          0
0101           0          0
0110           0          0
0111           0          0
1000           0          0
1001           0          0
1010           0          0
1011           0          0
1100           0          0
1101           0          0
1110           0          0
1111      756900  999716913

On an Opteron 2435 (x86-64):

0000   999995893       1901
0001           0          0
0010           0          0
0011           0          0
0100           0          0
0101           0          0
0110           0          0
0111           0          0
1000           0          0
1001           0          0
1010           0          0
1011           0          0
1100           0          0
1101           0          0
1110           0          0
1111        4107  999998099

Does this mean that Intel and/or AMD guarantee that 16 byte memory accesses are atomic on these machines? IMHO, it does not. It's not in the documentation as guaranteed architectural behavior, and thus one cannot know if on these particular processors 16 byte memory accesses really are atomic or whether the test program merely fails to trigger them for one reason or another. And thus relying on it is dangerous.

EDIT 2: How to make the test program fail

Ha! I managed to make the test program fail. On the same Opteron 2435 as above, with the same binary, but now running it via the "numactl" tool specifying that each thread runs on a separate socket, I got:

0000   999998634       5990
0001           0          0
0010           0          0
0011           0          0
0100           0          0
0101           0          0
0110           0          0
0111           0          0
1000           0          0
1001           0          0
1010           0          0
1011           0          0
1100           0          1  Not a single memory access!
1101           0          0
1110           0          0
1111        1366  999994009

So what does this imply? Well, the Opteron 2435 may, or may not, guarantee that 16-byte memory accesses are atomic for intra-socket accesses, but at least the cache coherency protocol running on the HyperTransport interconnect between the two sockets does not provide such a guarantee.

EDIT 3: ASM for the thread functions, on request of "GJ."

Here's the generated asm for the thread functions for the GCC 4.4 x86-64 version used on the Opteron 2435 system:


.globl thread2
        .type   thread2, @function
thread2:
.LFB537:
        .cfi_startproc
        movdqa  .LC3(%rip), %xmm1
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        .p2align 5,,24
        .p2align 3
.L11:
        movaps  x(%rip), %xmm0
        incl    %eax
        movaps  %xmm1, x(%rip)
        movmskps        %xmm0, %edx
        movslq  %edx, %rdx
        incl    n2(,%rdx,4)
        cmpl    $1000000000, %eax
        jne     .L11
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        ret
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE537:
        .size   thread2, .-thread2
        .p2align 5,,31
.globl thread1
        .type   thread1, @function
thread1:
.LFB536:
        .cfi_startproc
        pxor    %xmm1, %xmm1
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        .p2align 5,,24
        .p2align 3
.L15:
        movaps  x(%rip), %xmm0
        incl    %eax
        movaps  %xmm1, x(%rip)
        movmskps        %xmm0, %edx
        movslq  %edx, %rdx
        incl    n1(,%rdx,4)
        cmpl    $1000000000, %eax
        jne     .L15
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        ret
        .cfi_endproc

and for completeness, .LC3 which is the static data containing the (-1, -1, -1, -1) vector used by thread2:


.LC3:
        .long   -1
        .long   -1
        .long   -1
        .long   -1
        .ident  "GCC: (GNU) 4.4.4 20100726 (Red Hat 4.4.4-13)"
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

Also note that this is AT&T ASM syntax, not the Intel syntax Windows programmers might be more familiar with. Finally, this is with march=native which makes GCC prefer MOVAPS; but it doesn't matter, if I use march=core2 it will use MOVDQA for storing to x, and I can still reproduce the failures.

share|improve this answer
    
No! Reading or writing should be performed atomically granted by hardware up to 32 bytes if translated memory in under one cache line. Check my answer. –  GJ. Oct 7 '11 at 8:30
    
@GJ.No, you're wrong. The cache line size (64 bytes on most, if not all, x86 machines, FWIW) does not determine the atomicity of memory accesses. –  janneb Oct 7 '11 at 8:33
    
True for RMW, but not for single read xor write! If cache bust read/write is interrupted the exception fault is rasing. –  GJ. Oct 7 '11 at 8:42
    
Check again the Intel manual from your link section 8.1.1: Accesses to cacheable memory that are split across cache lines and page boundaries are not guaranteed to be atomic by the Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel® Atom™, Intel Core Duo, Pentium M, Pentium 4, Intel Xeon, P6 family, Pentium, and Intel486 processors. So, in any other case is atomic. –  GJ. Oct 7 '11 at 8:50
2  
@GJ.: I have no idea what you're trying to say, but anyway, if the processor implements a 16-byte store instruction internally as 2 8-byte stores in the store pipeline (as it's allowed to do per the architectural guarantees provided in the programming manual), it's perfectly possible for another processor to "steal" the cache line in between the two stores. Unlikely yes, but not impossible, as can be seen from the failed test I show in my answer. –  janneb Oct 7 '11 at 8:51

There is actually a warning in the Intel Architecture Manual Vol 3A. Section 8.1.1 (May 2011), under the section of guaranteed atomic operations:

An x87 instruction or an SSE instructions that accesses data larger than a quadword may be implemented using multiple memory accesses. If such an instruction stores to memory, some of the accesses may complete (writing to memory) while another causes the operation to fault for architectural reasons (e.g. due an page-table entry that is marked “not present”). In this case, the effects of the completed accesses may be visible to software even though the overall instruction caused a fault. If TLB invalidation has been delayed (see Section 4.10.4.4), such page faults may occur even if all accesses are to the same page.

thus SSE instructions are not guaranteed to be atomic, even if the underlying architecture does use a single memory access (this is one reason why the memory fencing was introduced).

Combine that with this statement from the Intel Optimization Manual, Section 13.3 (April 2011)

AVX and FMA instructions do not introduce any new guaranteed atomic memory operations.

and that fact that none of the load or store operation for SIMD guarantee atomicity, we can come to the conclusion that Intel doesn't not support any form of atomic SIMD (yet).

As an extra bit, if the memory is split along cache lines or page boundaries (when using things like movdqu which permit unaligned access), the following processors will not perform atomic accesses, regardless of alignment, but later processors will (again from the Intel Architecture Manual):

Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel® Atom™, Intel Core Duo, Pentium M, Pentium 4, Intel Xeon, P6 family, Pentium, and Intel486 processors. The Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Atom, Intel Core Duo, Pentium M, Pentium 4, Intel Xeon, and P6 family processors

share|improve this answer
    
The question explicitly states that all the 16-byte memory acceses are aligned to 16 bytes. Thus none of them, by construction, crosses cache lines or page boundaries. –  Atom Oct 7 '11 at 9:15
    
About the wording "may be implemented using multiple memory accesses" in the Intel Architecture Manual: My question is whether there exist concrete physical CPUs which happen to be implemented so that the memory accesses are always atomic. –  Atom Oct 7 '11 at 9:19
    
@Necrolis: Yes, and movdqa doesn't perform any SIMD operation it is only memory to register or register to memory move. –  GJ. Oct 7 '11 at 10:03
    
@Atom: That wording basically means: "there are none following this in our current product range, but we are free to add it in future", ie: there is no current processor that officially does this (from Intel), and tests at this level are unreliable as unofficial proof. The cache split/page boundary stuff was just some extra misc info, mainly for things like movdqu. –  Necrolis Oct 7 '11 at 10:52
    
@GJ: its still an SSE2 instruction, so it falls under the umbrella of Streaming SIMD (especially since the loads and stores are of multiple packed values). and btw, it also works on register to register moves :P –  Necrolis Oct 7 '11 at 10:53

The "AMD Architecture Programmer's Manual Volume 1: Application Programming" says in section 3.9.1: "CMPXCHG16B can be used to perform 16-byte atomic accesses in 64-bit mode (with certain alignment restrictions)."

However, there is no such comment about SSE instructions. In fact, there is a comment in 4.8.3 that the LOCK prefix "causes an invalid-opcode exception when used with 128-bit media instructions". It therefore seems pretty conclusive to me that the AMD processors do NOT guarantee atomic 128-bit accesses for SSE instructions, and the only way to do an atomic 128-bit access is to use CMPXCHG16B.

The "Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 3A: System Programming Guide, Part 1" says in 8.1.1 "An x87 instruction or an SSE instructions that accesses data larger than a quadword may be implemented using multiple memory accesses." This is pretty conclusive that 128-bit SSE instructions are never atomic. Volume 2A of the Intel docs says of CMPXCHG16B: "This instruction can be used with a LOCK prefix to allow the instruction to be executed atomically."

share|improve this answer
    
CMPXCHG16B instruction means: IF MEM[ADDR]==X THEN MEM[ADDR]:=Y. This implies that you already need to know the value X that is stored in memory at ADDR before writing Y. My question assumes that the 128-bit data type at ADDR uses all of the 128 bits - thus any of the (1<<128) possible values can be stored there. So, it is impossible to know whether MEM[ADDR] equals to X or not. (Sidenote: there is a universal method of how to encode a 16-byte value using more than 16 bytes (for example: 24 bytes) so that the 16 bytes can be read/written safely. But that is a different question.) –  Atom Oct 7 '11 at 16:40
2  
You can use CMPXCHG16B to read a value. First load any value into RDX:RAX, and load the same values into RCX:RBX. All registers zero would do. Then do CMPXCHG16B [addr]. If the values match then the same value is stored back. If they don't match then RDX:RAX is updated to the actual value. Either way RDX:RAX holds the original stored value, and the memory is unchanged. –  Anthony Williams Oct 7 '11 at 21:18
    
Indeed. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Atom Oct 8 '11 at 12:29
    
About your sentence "This is pretty conclusive that 128-bit SSE instructions are never atomic": There is no evidence to support this sentence on particular CPUs. The answers to my question so far support the claim that on Core2 Quad Q6600, Core2 Duo P8400, Pentium4 hyper-threading, Xeon X3450, Xeon 5150, and 1-socket Opteron 2435, the memory accesses are always atomic. Maybe the test program should be modified so that the data goes through the memory chip more often, or the test program should run for a longer period of time (1 hour) while running/doing other tasks on the machine. –  Atom Oct 8 '11 at 13:01
    
Sorry. I meant never guaranteed to be atomic. Particular CPUs may happen to make them atomic, and they may appear atomic under particular test conditions, but there is no guarantee. –  Anthony Williams Oct 8 '11 at 18:03

Lot of answers have been posted so far and hence lot of information is already available (as a side effect lot of confusion too). I would like to site facts from Intel manual regarding hardware guaranteed atomic operations ...

In Intel's latest processors of nehalem and sandy bridge family, reading or writing to a quadword aligned to 64 bit boundary is guaranteed.

Even unaligned 2, 4 or 8 byte reads or writes are guaranteed to be atomic provided they are cached memory and fit in a cache line.

Having said that the test posted in this question passes on sandy bridge based intel i5 processor.

share|improve this answer
1  
This question is specifically about 16 byte reads/writes, quadword is 8 bytes. In any case, thanks for running the test program. –  Atom Oct 10 '11 at 11:52

EDIT: In the last two days I have made several tests on my three PCs and I didn't reproduce any memory error, so I can't say anything more precisely. Maybe is this memory error also dependent from OS.

EDIT: I'm programing in Delphi and not in C but I should understand C. So I have translated the code, here are you have the threads procedures where the main part is made in assembler:

procedure TThread1.Execute;
var
  n             :cardinal;
const
  ConstAll0     :array[0..3] of integer =(0,0,0,0);
begin
  for n := 0 to 100000000 do
    asm
      movdqa    xmm0, dqword [x]
      movmskps  eax, xmm0
      inc       dword ptr[n1 + eax *4]
      movdqu    xmm0, dqword [ConstAll0]
      movdqa    dqword [x], xmm0
    end;
end;

{ TThread2 }

procedure TThread2.Execute;
var
  n             :cardinal;
const
  ConstAll1     :array[0..3] of integer =(-1,-1,-1,-1);
begin
  for n := 0 to 100000000 do
    asm
      movdqa    xmm0, dqword [x]
      movmskps  eax, xmm0
      inc       dword ptr[n2 + eax *4]
      movdqu    xmm0, dqword [ConstAll1]
      movdqa    dqword [x], xmm0
    end;
end;

Result: no mistake on my quad core PC and no mistake on my dual core PC as expected!

  1. PC with Intel Pentium4 CPU
  2. PC with Intel Core2 Quad CPU Q6600
  3. PC with Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400

Can you show how debuger see your thread procedure code? Please...

share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, when I ran the tests for my answer, I checked that GCC 4.1 and 4.4 (x86 and x86-64) use movdqa when storing to x. –  janneb Oct 7 '11 at 6:19
    
@janneb: ok I have translated main thread part of code to memonic and test it on two PCs. Result: no mistake! –  GJ. Oct 7 '11 at 7:17
    
@GJ: Thanks. Could you please update your answer to include the kind(s) of CPU(s) you tested - just like "janneb" did. –  Atom Oct 7 '11 at 8:51
    
@GJ: About the Pentium4 CPU you tested: Does it have multiple cores and/or hyper-threading? –  Atom Oct 7 '11 at 16:47
    
@Atom: First one has hyper-threading. Other two are woking under 4 and 2 cores. OS first two win XP and last one win Vista. –  GJ. Oct 7 '11 at 18:53

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