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What would cause a jar to be added successfully to an Eclipse Java project but then at runtime some of the classes from that jar are not found with ClassNotFound exceptions?

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4 Answers 4

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The CLASSPATH variable at runtime is likely set incorrectly or you missed adding some classes to your jar file.

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I unzipped the jar and looked through it - I see the class in there. As for the Classpath, I thought Eclipse automatically takes care of that when you add a jar to your project under the Libraries tab of the Java Build Path -> that's where I added it using "Add external jar". So you're saying that's not enough - I can't trust Eclipse to know that this also needs to be added to the classpath? –  Michael Jay Apr 19 '09 at 1:33
    
Java is a complex beast so your use of the word link in the question throws off the discussion. At its heart the jar file is just a zip file. Depending on how you import the classes and the directory structure of your jar file adding the toplevel jar file may simply not be enough... Are these classes by any chance anonymous inner classes? –  ojblass Apr 19 '09 at 1:39
    
@Michael, how are you running the application? –  matt b Apr 19 '09 at 1:48
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There's a distinct difference between making a JAR available at compile-time and making it available at run-time –  matt b Apr 19 '09 at 1:50
    
No the class in question is not an anonymous inner class - just your plain vanilla kind. For what it's worth, its the Google Guice framework and the class is called com.google.inject.Module. I was just trying to add this framework to an open source project that required it but did not provide it as part of its own source. I've spent the entire day trying different ways to get these two to build. But that's besides the point-based on the new information I gave you it's probably not the CLASSPATH? –  Michael Jay Apr 19 '09 at 1:50

@ojblass almost certainly has it right. Just to extend it, you can dump the jar file with the jar(1) tool and see if the class is there. I've had surprises from Eclipse where the project definition didn't understand what was to go into a jar file I was generating to run with java -jar.

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On that topic I am dying to know if I can export what eclipse thinks the project should be built like... I hate headless builds... –  ojblass Apr 19 '09 at 1:27
    
I unzipped the jar and looked through it - I see the class in there. As for the Classpath, I thought Eclipse automatically takes care of that when you add a jar to your project under the Libraries tab of the Java Build Path -> that's where I added it using "Add external jar". So you're saying that's not enough - I can't trust Eclipse to know that this also needs to be added to the classpath? –  Michael Jay Apr 19 '09 at 1:34
    
@oj, I hate IDEs in general. @Michael, tell us how you're running the program. If it's with 'java -jar' then it should be working, making me suspect you're running from the command line with -classpath, or haven't told Eclipse to run as a jar file, and Eclipse is generating the -classpath form. –  Charlie Martin Apr 19 '09 at 1:40
    
Also if you can run the stuff in eclipse it may be a good idea to maybe look at Run As... definitions for some hints. –  ojblass Apr 19 '09 at 1:42
    
@ojblass - Under "Run Configurations" I see the guice.jar in the Classpath section as well as in the Source tab ("Source Lookup Path"). –  Michael Jay Apr 19 '09 at 2:01

Everybody seems to be on the right track. Why don't you, while you have the jar unzipped, add the entire thing as a source folder in your eclipse project to see if you can even load it that way? Sometimes, depending on the classloader, you can get the CNFE if your class is available multiple times on the classpath... the classloader just bails because it doesn't know which one to use.

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Would it not simply take the first one it finds from the classpath? –  ojblass Apr 19 '09 at 2:10
    
You would thing so, but I believe I ran into at least the classloader used in Sybase Jaguar that would bail on duplicated classpath entries instead of taking the first one –  John Ellinwood Apr 19 '09 at 2:14
    
I will have to file that one away... You know that might explain some hack job I had to do for an JDBC project... I swear my eyes were bleeding at the time. –  ojblass Apr 19 '09 at 2:18
    
Now that it's working thanks to everyone's help, I'm kind of wondering why it didn't work before because now the jar files are listed twice under the classpath tab - once under "bootstrap entries" and once under "user entries". The user entries seem to come from the project settings that you need for compilation. But it was only after I duplicated the jars in the "bootstrap entries" that it actually worked. Not sure why this would be. Any ideas on that? –  Michael Jay Apr 19 '09 at 2:21
    
I think the bootstrap adds some meta information to jars... ears, wars, and jars all have files or properties within them that get autochecked at runtime... I avoid IDEs and little defaulting nits to the point of it being a religion. I explicity avoid any nicities an IDE gives me and make my code both at compile time and at runtime so explicit that it boarders on tedious –  ojblass Apr 19 '09 at 2:27

I had this error occur up for having a missing permission. Turns out checking to see if you are connected to the internet (i.e., reachability) and permission to use the internet are separate permissions (live and learn.)

The missing permission caused the app to fail with ClassNotFound error when it tried to run a reachability test.

Hope that helps someone because this was not a fun time sink to work through.

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