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I am trying to define a Vector3 data type in haskell and allow the (+) operator to be used on it. I tried the following:

data Vector3 = Vector3 Double Double Double    
Vector3 x y z + Vector3 x' y' z' = Vector3 (x+x') (y+y') (z+z')

But ghci complains about ambiguous occurrence of (+). I do not understand why the occurrence is ambiguous; surely the type checker can infer that x, x', y etc have type Double and hence the correct operator to use for them is Prelude.+ ?

I know that I could make Vector3 an instance of the Num typeclass, but that is too restrictive for me; I do not want to define multiplication of a vector by another vector.

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2 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The only way to overload a name in Haskell is to use type classes, so you have three choices:

  • Make Vector an instance of Num and just have multiplication return an error.
  • Use something like the numeric prelude, which defines more fine-grained numeric classes.
  • Pick some other name like .+. or something similar for vector addition.
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thanks for pointing to numeric prelude; do you know any place it is documented? –  xuanji Oct 4 '11 at 12:33
    
@zodiac: Reference documentation is available on the link I posted, just scroll to the bottom and click on a module name. Algebra.Additive looks like a good place to start for this example of adding vectors. –  hammar Oct 4 '11 at 12:44
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Conal Elliott's vector-space package is much more lightweight than numeric-prelude. For adding vectors define an instance of AdditiveGroup. –  stephen tetley Oct 4 '11 at 16:52
    
thank you all for your helpful answers; but does anyone know why the occurrence of (+) is ambiguous (ie my code actually works if I use "Prelude.+" and "Main.+" –  xuanji Oct 5 '11 at 14:45
    
@zodiac: It's ambiguous because you have two (+) in scope. One that you defined yourself, and the one from the Prelude. So without qualification, the compiler does not know which one you want to use. –  hammar Oct 5 '11 at 14:48
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I know that I could make Vector3 an instance of the Num typeclass, but that is too restrictive for me; I do not want to define multiplication of a vector by another vector.

That would be the easiest solution, though. You can define multiplication as

(*)  =  error "vector multiplication not implemented"

Think of the vector operations that you would get for free!

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You actually don't need any parameters. error :: String -> a. –  FUZxxl Oct 4 '11 at 10:48
    
Sorry, what vector operations do I get for free? –  xuanji Oct 4 '11 at 10:50
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You get - if you define negate. You get sum. Okay, maybe not that great, but typeclasses are the "proper" way of overloading in Haskell. –  larsmans Oct 4 '11 at 10:52
    
The main problem with making vectors a Num instance is that you would like to define a multiplication, but not as Vector->Vector->Vector but as Field->Vector->Vector or Num a => a->Vector->Vector. –  leftaroundabout Oct 4 '11 at 11:10
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@Landei: Yes, there is something wrong: the type. –  Alexey Romanov Oct 4 '11 at 11:56
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