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Is it possible to create an object of a class, inside a class definition, without using default constructor?

class Vector3D {
public:
Vector3D(int x, int y, int z);
virtual ~Vector3D();

private:
int m_X;
int m_y;
int m_z;
};

class CustomClass {
private:
Vector3D m_Vec(50,50,50); //error
};
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, this can be done, but the syntax is different:

class Vector3D {
public:
Vector3D(int x, int y, int z);
virtual ~Vector3D();

private:
int m_X;
int m_y;
int m_z;
};

class CustomClass {
private:
Vector3D m_Vec;

public:
CustomClass(): m_Vec(50,50,50) {}
};
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Error: no default constructor exists for class Vector3D –  xcrypt Oct 4 '11 at 11:13
    
@xcrypt: I don't get that error (or any other error). Please make sure you're trying the code exactly as above. –  NPE Oct 4 '11 at 11:15
    
Aha. Nvm. You're right :) I 'forgot' initialise the vector inside the constructor after, because of the error msg. –  xcrypt Oct 4 '11 at 11:23
    
Can you also answer my next question though? "why?" why is it not possible? –  xcrypt Oct 4 '11 at 11:24
    
@xcrypt: it's "not possible" simply because your version is not the syntax for initializing data members. aix's version is. This way, different constructors can initialize m_Vec with different values. I suppose the language could have allowed both syntaxes (along with some rules what happens if both are used for the same data member), but it happens not to. –  Steve Jessop Oct 4 '11 at 11:43
class CustomClass { 
   private: 
     Vector3D m_Vec;
   public:
    CustomClass() : m_Vec(50,50,50) {}
}
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In the (now current) C++11 standard you can actually do that using uniform-initialization and Non-static data member initializers (N2756):

class CustomClass {
private:
   Vector3D m_Vec{50,50,50};
};

Now, the problem is that not all compilers have support for all of the new features. In particular gcc 4.7 is the first of the gcc versions to support this form of initialization.

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