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Can someone tell me the difference between these two versions of a declaration of a structure?

struct S
{
  uint8_t a;
};

and

const struct S
{
  uint8_t a;
}

Followed by:

void main(void)
{
  struct S s = {1};
  s.a++;
}

Hint, i've tried both versions for S in Visual Studio C++ 2010 Express so I know that both compile with errors.

Is the "const struct" doing nothing at all? "const struct S s = {1};" certainly does, but that's not the issue at the moment.

Regards Rich

/********************************************/

I've just worked out what

const struct <typename> <{type}> <variable instances a, b, .., z>;

is doing:

When const is present before the "struct", all variable instances are const, as though they'd be defined with:

const struct <typename> a, b, z;

So it does do something, but not when there's no instance definitions in-line with the struct declaration.

Rich

share|improve this question
    
There's a missing semi-colon at the end of the second one, which means you've specified two different types in the place where the return type of main belongs. Neither of those types is what it should be -- int. I can't remember whether or not you're allowed to define a type in a function definition (and anyway it's not entirely clear to what language you're compiling this code as), that could be an additional error. –  Steve Jessop Oct 4 '11 at 11:58
    
Other than void main(), what other problems are there @KerrekSB –  Luchian Grigore Oct 4 '11 at 11:59
    
Sorry about the C++, I deleted my comment. @Rich: You're missing a semicolon in the second snippet, and void main(void) is not allowed. –  Kerrek SB Oct 4 '11 at 12:00
    
Is there any chance you could show us the code you are actually working with. The missing semi-colon makes me think there may be other issues. –  David Heffernan Oct 4 '11 at 12:09
    
The lack of a semi-colon is cus i typed it in free-hand. That isn't the issue here. @SteveJessop its PHP (sarc) –  RichColours Oct 4 '11 at 13:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With:

const struct S
{
  uint8_t a;
};

The const qualifier there is nonsense, and may even cause a compilation error with some C compilers. gcc issues a warning.

The intent appears to be to declare the data type struct S. In this case, the proper syntax is:

struct S
{
  uint8_t a;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, my VC didnt issue a warning, nor did my Motorola HS12 compiler about this. It arose from working on some embedded code. I thought i'd dip back to VC and check my findings over const struct declaration. I'll give that a go in gcc! –  RichColours Oct 4 '11 at 13:07

A declaration of structure just defines the data type.

const qualifier appies to a variable not a data type. So adding const preceeding a struct declaration should be redundant at the most.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think this is +1 because of the distinction between "types" and "qualifiers", which is important here. –  Kerrek SB Oct 4 '11 at 12:02
const struct S
{
  uint8_t a;
};

is not a valid construct.

This

const struct S
{
  uint8_t a;
} x;

could possibly be valid as you're declaring a variable x that is now const, meaning it cannot change.

share|improve this answer
    
The semi-colon on the end of the struct was an accident. I'm defining my s in main() not inline with the struct declaration. –  RichColours Oct 4 '11 at 13:05
    
In fact, i've just tried const struct S { uint8_t a; }; in VC and it's compiled without giving any variable instance names. So maybe we all need to check our songbooks before posting "X is wrong" in someone's post. –  RichColours Oct 4 '11 at 13:08

The const qualifier applies to variables or members. To instantiate a const variable, just specify const during instantiation.

What const does, is:

  • during compilation, verify that only reads are performed on the const variables
  • if the const variable is created with a value which can be resolved during compilation, put the variable in the program memory

When const is applied to members, like in:

struct T {
    int const i;
    int j;
};

You can only (legally) assign the value i during the creation of the structure. You may be able to modify a const value (if the program memory sits in RAM and not ROM) by casting it to a non-const type (const-cast) but this is something you shouldn't do.

The typical usage of const-cast is when you use a library which does not specify the constness in function declarations, and your code does. At this point if you want to use it you have to trust it and cast parameters before calling its functions.

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When you declare

const var;

then it allocate the some memory space for it but

struct var;

it was just an declaration compiler does not allocate any space for it. so it shows the error and in const struct you didn't declare any varible see the code so it shows error.

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It is nonsense to use const keyword before struct.

If you are using gcc compiler, it shows you the following warning:

warning: useless type qualifier in empty declaration [enabled by default]

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite. See question edit. –  michaelb958 Jun 14 '13 at 13:35

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