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I was reading about mysql transactions and I was under the impression that you had to use either mysqli or PDO in order to create transactions. However, I see all over stack exchange and other sites examples that use the mysql extension like this:

mysql_query("START TRANSACTION");
$rollback=0

if (!mysql_query($query1)){
$rollback=1
}

if (!mysql_query($query2)){
$rollback=1
}

if (!mysql_query($query3)){
$rollback=1
}

if ($rollback == 1){
mysql_query("ROLLBACK");
}
else{
mysql_query("COMMIT");
}

What is the difference between doing it this way and using the "special" mysqli specific functions mysqli::rollback and mysqli::commit?

Also, what happens if the php script crashes (IE my app server crashes etc), does the DB server automatically rollback the transaction after a set timeperiod?

Similarly, what happens if the DB server crashes before mysql_query("COMMIT")? Would the transaction be "rolled back"?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's also perfectly legal and is using MySQL statements directly to implement transaction.

And frankly, I don't see any improvements by using the mysqli syntax. It's a failed abstraction since it maps 1:1 on MySQL only. It would make more sense to use the higher level syntax in PDO, since it will map with a different syntax according to the underlying DB.

However, as Hakre says: mysqli is preferred for performance and interoperability reasons, it's the recommended mysql lib in PHP.

Similarly, what happens if the DB server crashes before mysql_query("COMMIT")? Would the transaction be "rolled back"?

It's easier that an application program crashes rather than a DB server. Any non committed transaction will be rolled back.

Also a transaction can be rolled back because it can't acquire a lock within a certain timeout.

The timeout in seconds an InnoDB transaction may wait for a row lock before giving up. The default value is 50 seconds. A transaction that tries to access a row that is locked by another InnoDB transaction will hang for at most this many seconds before issuing the following error:

ERROR 1205 (HY000): Lock wait timeout exceeded; try restarting transaction

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So unless I'm using prepared statements or an object oriented notation, there is really no need for me to switch to mysqli? Why is there so much confusion over this? It seems like a lot of people believe that you cannot use mysql/ext for transactions. IE, if you look up mysql vs mysqli a big seeling point for mysqli seems to be transactions when they are possible using mysql... Is there a "gotcha" I should know about or are people just being fanboys? –  billmalarky Oct 4 '11 at 12:15
    
@billmalarky: You should got with mysqli for performance and interoperability reasons, it's the recommended mysql lib in PHP. The mysql (w/o the i), is not getting much attention any longer, you mostly run over old code. –  hakre Oct 4 '11 at 12:17
    
@stivlo Also, if the DB server crashes are you kind of in a pickle? As in, maybe the transaction will commit and maybe not depending on luck (I'm under the impression that perfect ACID is not possible). –  billmalarky Oct 4 '11 at 12:17
1  
@stilvo, when the connection drops the transaction will always be rolled back, because a rollback will be issued upon reconnect, regardless of timeouts. –  Johan Oct 4 '11 at 12:19
1  
You say "unless I'm using prepared statements" like it's something you wouldn't do. Personally, I hold the opinion that prepared statements are the only really safe way to protect yourself from SQL Inection. When using mysql_real_escape_string, it's way too easy to forget to use it, or naively leave it on on something you think is an integer (because in PHP all variables are dynamic). If you only ever use prepared statements, then SQL injection is impossible. –  Kibbee Oct 4 '11 at 12:27

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