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I am new to c++, and am trying to port a program i have made in python to c++. I have a struct that is a linked list with a list of parts. Each of these parts contains one or more components. So i have tried to create two structs, where one struct links to the other struct.

But i dont seem to get the list_part to link to component_list.

struct list_part {
    char partname[100];
    int parttype;
    component_list * comp;
    list_part * next;
};

struct component_list {
    char compname[100];
    component_list * next;
};

I use the following function to add the part to the bottom of the list.

void addpart(char partname[], int parttype, component_list *newcomp) {
    struct list_part *temppart;
    struct list_part *currentpart;

    temppart = (struct list_part *)malloc(sizeof(struct list_part));
    strcpy_s(temppart->partname,partname);
    temppart->parttype = parttype;
    temppart->comp = newcomp;

    currentpart = head;

    if (head == NULL) {
        head = temppart;
        head->next = NULL;
    } else {
        while (currentpart->next != NULL) {
            currentpart = currentpart->next;
        }
        temppart->next = NULL;
        currentpart->next = temppart;
    }
}

And a similar function to add the component to a list.

void addcomp(char compname[]) { 
    struct component_list *tempcomp;
    struct component_list *currentcomp;

    tempcomp = (struct component_list *)malloc(sizeof(struct list_part));
    strcpy_s(tempcomp->compname,compname);

    currentcomp = newcomp;

    if (currentcomp == NULL) {
        currentcomp = tempcomp;
        currentcomp->next = NULL;
    } else {
        while (currentcomp->next != NULL) {
            currentcomp = currentcomp->next;
        }

        tempcomp->next = NULL;
        currentcomp->next = tempcomp;
    }
}

When the first component in a part is present i try to add it with.

struct component_list *newcomp = NULL;
strcpy_s(compname,temp.c_str());
addcomp(compname);

and the rest of the components i was planing to add with these commands

strcpy_s(compname,temp.c_str());
addcomp(compname);

And finally this is added as a part with

addpart(partname,fluidname, parttype, newcomp);

When i do it this way the newcomp only returns 00000000, but i need it to return a pointer to the list with components for this part. I have no idea how to do this really, i am used to dynamic languages, and this is not an issue there. I have figured this is the best way to go about this, but am very open to suggestions for other solutions. As data structures is something i am very fresh at.

share|improve this question
2  
In some places you say C and others C/C++ do you mean C as the question appears to say if so please remove the C++ references (The answers differ greatly for C or C++ and there is no such thing as c/c++) – Mark Oct 4 '11 at 12:15
    
How you define a struct with members from type that is not defined yet? i dont think its possible in c (I.E list_part * next inside struct list_part) – Gil.I Oct 4 '11 at 12:19
    
I'd suggets he removes the C tag also ( there are 'struct' s missing before the struct-tags) – wildplasser Oct 4 '11 at 12:20
1  
@GilIdelson: That is actually quite common. You can define a pointer to a type that is not yet fully defined, what you cannot is define a variable of that particular type. Note that for the pointer, the compiler only needs to know the size of a pointer in the architecture and reserve that space, it does not need to use the size of the type itself – David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 4 '11 at 12:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have 2 big mistakes in addcomp function, this should work: (also moved some things)

void addcomp(char compname[]) { 
    struct component_list *tempcomp;
    struct component_list *currentcomp;

    tempcomp = (struct component_list *)malloc(sizeof(struct component_list/*FIX 1*/));
    strcpy_s(tempcomp->compname,compname);
    tempcomp->next = NULL; /*Better do it here*/

    if (newcomp == NULL) {
        newcomp = tempcomp;/*FIX 2*/
    } else {
        currentcomp = newcomp; /*Better do it here*/
        while (currentcomp->next != NULL) {
            currentcomp = currentcomp->next;
        }
        currentcomp->next = tempcomp;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Since you are open for suggestions, I think the best suggestion is You should be using std::list. instead of your own linked list implementaion.

std::list is a ready to use STL container provided by the C++ Standard library and it is always going to be more efficient that any list implementation you write.

share|improve this answer
1  
"is always going to be more efficient" - and if you're interested in efficiency, then vector and deque are frequently (but not always) better choices than list. – Steve Jessop Oct 4 '11 at 12:21
1  
std::list is disastrous in terms of performance. Both because you have no option of intrusive linked list, plus it's designed so that it allocates a fictive node even when it's empty. I'm a kernel-mode driver developer for over 10 years, and I know what's performance. – valdo Oct 4 '11 at 12:23
2  
To add to @SteveJessop's comment, If efficency is the aim then the chioce of the container will vary depending on 2 factors: 1. Data you want to store in the Container & 2. Operations you want to perform on the data. – Alok Save Oct 4 '11 at 12:23
1  
@valdo: it sort of depends whether Als meant "more efficient than any implementation you write of the same interface that std::list has" (true for the time being, since the questioner is a novice), or "more efficient than any implementation you write of any kind of linked list" (probably not true). As well as what you've said, the above is a singly-linked list, so certainly doesn't do everything std::list does. And as you say, being non-intrusive std::list is pretty extravagant as linked lists go. – Steve Jessop Oct 4 '11 at 12:29
1  
@valdo: While I am glad to know that We have amongst us an kernel mode developer with 10yrs exp & who knows what performance is, Your comment is a bit of an premature perception of what the OP expects, in this case clearly the OP is unaware of existence of std::list & hence chooses to write his own list implementation. Given that to dissuade the OP from using the std::list just because it doesn't satisfy your expectations of performance is incorrect. – Alok Save Oct 4 '11 at 12:40

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