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I have the following two interfaces:

public interface ParsedFile<K, V extends FileEntry>{...}

And

public interface MetricsProduces<K, V extends FileEntry>{
    Metrics generateMetrics(ParsedFile<K, V> parsedFile);
}

I have the following generic code the should be able to handle any FileEntry types:

Option<FileDefinition> option = fileContainer.matchFile(file);
if (option.isSome){
  FileDefinition fileDef = option.some();
  ParsedFileFactory<?> factory = filterDefinition.getFactory();
  ParsedFile<?, ?> parsedFile = factory.parseFile(file);
  MetricsProducer<?, ?> metricsProducer = fileDefinition.getMetricsProducer();
  Metrics metrics = metricsProducer.generateMetrics(parsedFile);
}

This block of code is designed to be able to parse any type of file given the appropriate FileDefinition. However I am getting the following compile-time error:

The method generateMetrics(ParsedFile<capture#5-of ?, capture#6-of ? extends FileEntry>) 
in the type MetricsProducer<capture#5-of ?, cature#6-of ? extends FileEntry> 
is not applicable for the arguments 
(ParsedFile<capture#7 of ?, capture#8-of ? extends FileEntry>)

Is there a way to let the compiler know that the "?" type of ParsedFile is the same as the "?" type of MetricsProducer? Is there another option for doing this?

Edit:

I have fixed (as noted this causes a cast warning) the code as follows but was wondering if there is a better option:

public interface MetricsProduces<K, V extends FileEntry>{
    Metrics generateMetrics(ParsedFile<?, ? extends FileEntry> parsedFile);
}

public class TasksMetricsProduces<String, TaskFileEntry> implements MetricsProduces<...>{

    public Metrics generateMetrics(ParsedFile<?, ? extends FileEntry> parsedFile){
         ParsedFile<String, TaskFileEntry> parsedFile2 = (ParsedFile<String, TaskFileEntry>)parsedFile;
    }
}

Edit 2: per comments / suggestions

So I found that if I lock down the types earlier I can do the following:

public interface FileDefinition<K, V extends FileEntry, T extends ParsedFile<K, V>>{...


public void myMethod(){
     for (FileDefinition<?, ?, ?> def : defs){
         process(def);
     }
}

private <K, V extends FileEntry, T extends ParsedFile<K, V>> process(FileDefinition<K, V, T> def){
     Factory<T> factory = def.getFactory();
     MetricsProducer<K, V> producer = def.getMetricsProducer();
     ParsedFile<K, V> parsedFile = factory.parseFile();
     Metrics metrics = producer.generateMetrics(parsedFile);
}

Thanks for the suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
By "fixed" you mean that it now produces an "unchecked" warning? –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Oct 4 '11 at 12:33
1  
Why use generics when you use everything in a polymorphic way? –  Nicola Musatti Oct 4 '11 at 12:34
    
@AlexanderPogrebnyak Correct :) That is why I am still searching for a better solution –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 12:34
    
@NicolaMusatti The TasksMetricsProducer extends AbstractMetricsProducer<String, TaskEntry> where the TaskEntry is an enum that the AbstractMetricsProducer needs for iteration. It seemed appropriate to only accept an instance of ParsedFile<TaskEntry> so that the MetricsProducer is using the same enum as the ParsedFile. Trying to get values out of an unrelated ParsedFile is not valid. The original purpose of the generics was to ensure that it was not possible to provide the wrong type. As least with the case I am checking the condition. –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 12:40
    
Maybe you meant to call process() inside the loop in myMethod()? Your example would be clearer. –  Nicola Musatti Oct 5 '11 at 7:21
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4 Answers

Regarding your comments above and the following code I think there is no easy soltion:

ParsedFile<?, ?> parsedFile = factory.parseFile(file);
MetricsProducer<?, ?> metricsProducer = fileDefinition.getMetricsProducer();

as long as factory.parseFile(...) or ParsedFileFactory itself isn't paremeterized properly as well as fileDefinition.getMetricsProducer() or FileDefinition you can never be sure that the objects created by the two of these methods are matching.

share|improve this answer
    
I see your point. If FileDefinition was generic as FileDefinition<K, V extends FileEntry> then I could write a method: <K, V> void process(FileDefinition<K, V> def) that should work. I will give it a try and report back. –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 14:10
    
So it worked out. I have updated my post. –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 14:22
add comment

Maybe you can bind the ? to the same type parameter in way similar to this:

<K, V extends FileEntry> void myMethod(){
    Option<FileDefinition> option = fileContainer.matchFile(file);
    if (option.isSome){
        FileDefinition fileDef = option.some();
        ParsedFileFactory<?> factory = filterDefinition.getFactory();
        ParsedFile<K, V> parsedFile = factory.parseFile(file);
        MetricsProducer<K, V> metricsProducer = fileDefinition.getMetricsProducer();
        Metrics metrics = metricsProducer.generateMetrics(parsedFile);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe you can specify the type arguments to a generic method at runtime. I tried Type k = String.class; Type v = TaskEntry.class; this.<k,v>myMethod; and got a k cannot be resolved to a type'. Also tried it with Class k...` –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 13:21
    
Why do you need to? –  Gandalf Oct 4 '11 at 13:24
    
But yes you can: <K, V extends FileEntry> void myMethod(Class<K> kClass, Class<V> vClass){...} and then this.myMethod(k, v) –  Gandalf Oct 4 '11 at 13:25
    
I don't know the types of ParsedFile and MetricsProducer at compile-time. The point is the code needs to allow for multiple types. –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 13:28
    
I could create a method that took classes but I still would not be able to declare the variables. This would not compile: void myMethod(Class<K> kClass){ ParsedFile<kClass> parsedFile;} Error = kClass cannot be resolved to a type. –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 13:29
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Found that it worked if I locked down the generic types earlier to show the compiler that the types for the objects are the same.

public interface FileDefinition<K, V extends FileEntry, T extends ParsedFile<K, V>>{...


public void myMethod(){
     for (FileDefinition<?, ?, ?> def : defs){
         process(def);
     }
}

private <K, V extends FileEntry, T extends ParsedFile<K, V>> process(FileDefinition<K, V, T> def){
     Factory<T> factory = def.getFactory();
     MetricsProducer<K, V> producer = def.getMetricsProducer();
     ParsedFile<K, V> parsedFile = factory.parseFile();
     Metrics metrics = producer.generateMetrics(parsedFile);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
MetricsProducer<?, ? extends FileEntry> metricsProducer = fileDefinition.getMetricsProducer();
share|improve this answer
    
Tried that. No joy. The compiler is still seeing the two "?" in the metricsProducer and different than the two "?" in ParsedFile. –  John B Oct 4 '11 at 12:36
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