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What would be an elegant way to map a two parameter lambda function to a list of values where the first parameter is constant and the second is taken from a list?

Example:

lambda x,y: x+y
x='a'
y=['2','4','8','16']

expected result:

['a2','a4','a8','a16']

Notes:

  • This is just an example, the actual lambda function is more complicated
  • Assume I can't use list comprehension
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up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can use itertools.starmap

a = itertools.starmap(lambda x,y: x+y, zip(itertools.repeat(x), y))
a = list(a)

and you get your desired output.

BTW, both itertools.imap and Python3's map will accept the following:

itertools.imap(lambda x,y: x+y, itertools.repeat(x), y)

The default Python2's map will not stop at the end of y and will insert Nones...


But a comprehension is much better

[x + num for num in y]
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1  
+1 for suggesting pythonic list comprehension instead of that gross ol' map function (= -- although I just noticed the asker states "assume I can't use list comprehension" – Cody Hess Oct 4 '11 at 12:32

Python 2.x

from itertools import repeat

map(lambda (x, y): x + y, zip(repeat(x), y))

Python 3.x

map(lambda xy: ''.join(xy), zip(repeat(x), y))
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Just be aware that it won't work on Python 3... – JBernardo Oct 4 '11 at 12:29
    
@JBernardo, did they take 'unpacking in signature' away? I seem to remember something along those lines. – Adam Wagner Oct 4 '11 at 12:31
    
Yes, that's why I suggested starmap on my answer. – JBernardo Oct 4 '11 at 12:33

Also you could use closure for this

x='a'
f = lambda y: x+y
map(f, ['1', '2', '3', '4', '5'])
>>> ['a1', 'a2', 'a3', 'a4', 'a5']
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def prependConstant(x, y):
  return map(lambda yel: x + yel, y)
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['a' + x for x in y]

or if you really need a callable:

def f(x, y):
    return x + y

[f('a', x) for x in y]
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Do you have to use lambda?

>>> x='a'
>>> y=['2','4','8','16']
>>> map(x.__add__, y)
['a2', 'a4', 'a8', 'a16']
>>> 
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BTW, both itertools.imap and Python3's map will accept the following:

itertools.imap(lambda x,y: x+y, itertools.repeat(x), y) The default Python2's map will not stop at the end of y and will insert Nones...

I just wanted to add on to this answer that in python 2.x you can do something like

map(lambda x,y: x+y, itertools.repeat(x, len(y)))

to get itertools to stop iterating.

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