Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a table called Staging into which I place all the data from an excel spreadsheet, get the ID number from it by looking up the existing model/table, and then compare it with the current database which is SQL Server 2008.

My code is as follows:

def compare 

require 'rubygems'
require 'spreadsheet'
require 'set'

Spreadsheet.client_encoding = 'UTF-8'
file_full_path = File.expand_path(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), "../../SISlist.xls"))
book = Spreadsheet.open(file_full_path) #Select excel file
sheet = book.worksheet 0 #Select 1st worksheet
app,server,env = 0

for i in 1..500
  row = sheet.row(i)

    if row[0].to_s != "" # Makes sure no empty cells are saved
     row.each do |t|
     app = App.find_by_name(row[0].to_s)
     server = Server.find_by_name(row[2].to_s)
     env = Environment.find_by_code(row[3].to_s)
    end
Staging.create(:app => app.id, :server => server.id, :environment => env.id)
  end
 end
end

The problem I'm having now is that it takes extremely long to carry out this method (almost 20 seconds), when all my other methods of similar sort don't take that long.

Any way to speed up this process or maybe my flow of work is incorrect and hence the whole architecture is wrong?

Help needed

share|improve this question
    
You might be able to use batched find –  jaydel Oct 4 '11 at 12:55
    
@jaydel would that work with RoR 3? Because it says 2.3 so it may be depreciated? –  teenOmar Oct 4 '11 at 13:33
    
Yeah, it appears so. sorry for the bad link. Here's a better one--a great guide –  jaydel Oct 4 '11 at 13:48
    
thanks @jaydel, will surely look at it –  teenOmar Oct 4 '11 at 13:50
    
What are you doing this for? row.each do |t| ? –  Jesse Wolgamott Oct 4 '11 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

To speed up try

ActiveRecord::Base.transaction do
  500.times do |i|
    row = sheet.row(i)
    if row[0].to_s != "" # Makes sure no empty cells are saved
      app = App.find_by_name(row[0].to_s)
      server = Server.find_by_name(row[2].to_s)
      env = Environment.find_by_code(row[3].to_s)
      Staging.create(:app => app.id, :server => server.id, :environment => env.id)
     end
  end
end

also are you aware that app,server,env = 0 doesn't initialize all values with zero?

share|improve this answer
    
Oh? I thought it'd initialize them? otherwise can I just state their existence without initializing them? Tried your code, but I get this error message Called id for nil, which would mistakenly be 4 -- if you really wanted the id of nil, use object_id. Any ideas why? –  teenOmar Oct 4 '11 at 13:32
    
I managed to get it working, but the error that came up was due to the 500.times do |i| loop, not sure why though. Using the transaction did not increase it in speed unfortunately. Any other ideas? –  teenOmar Oct 4 '11 at 14:21
    
How do I do that? never done it before... –  teenOmar Oct 4 '11 at 14:38
    
Here you go gist.github.com/1261811 –  teenOmar Oct 4 '11 at 14:42
    
I missed one end check gist.github.com/1261838 it should do the same thing. I'll be back in a few hours will try to speed up execution. –  Bohdan Oct 4 '11 at 14:56

If you only have a couple hundred rows then you could try doing it in three steps:

  1. Spin through the spreadsheet to collect all the App, Server, and Environment names/codes.
  2. Bulk load your App, Server, and Environment into hashes.
  3. Spin through the spreadsheet again to do your Staging.create calls.

Something like this:

sets = {
    :apps         => Set.new,
    :servers      => Set.new,
    :environments => Set.new
}
(1 .. 500).select { |i| !sheet.row(i).to_s.empty? }.each do |i|
    sets[:apps].add(row[0].to_s)
    #...
end

# You could just pull in the ids and names here rather than whole objects too.
sets[:apps] = Set.where(:name => sets[:apps].to_a).each_with_object({ }) { |a,h| h[a.name] = a.id }
#...

(1 .. 500).select { |i| !sheet.row(i).to_s.empty? }.each do |i|
    Staging.create(
        :app => sets[:apps][row[0].to_s],
        #...
    )
end

Basically I'm guessing that your biggest hit is calling find_by... over and over again instead of just doing it once.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.