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Let's say I have the following classes and interfaces in my MVC 2 project:

Repositories:

IRepository1, IRepository2, IRepository3

public class ConcreteRepository1 : IRepository1
{
     public ConcreteRepository1()
     {
         ...
     }
     ...
}

public class ConcreteRepository2 : IRepository2
{
     public ConcreteRepository2()
     {
         ...
     }
     ...
}

public class ConcreteRepository3 : IRepository3
{
     public ConcreteRepository3()
     {
         ...
     }
     ...
}

Service classes:

public class Service1
{
    private IRepository1 repo1;
    private IRepository2 repo2;

    public Service1(IRepository1 repo1, IRepository2 repo2)
    {
        this.repo1 = repo1;
        this.repo2 = repo2;
    }
    ...
}

Controllers:

public class Controller1 : Controller
{
    private Service1 srv1;
    private Service2 srv2;

    public Controller1(Service1 srv1, Service2 srv2)
    {
        this.srv1 = srv1;
        this.srv2 = srv2;
    }
    ...
}

I have custom ControllerFactory and I know how to tie concrete repositories to interfaces:

IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
container.RegisterType<IRepository1, ConcreteRepository1>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), new InjectionConstructor());
container.RegisterType<IRepository2, ConcreteRepository2>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), new InjectionConstructor());
container.RegisterType<IRepository3, ConcreteRepository3>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), new InjectionConstructor());

The question is how should I register services' instances and controllers' types inside my custom ControllerFactory to make unity container resolve the whole hierarchy Controller->Service->Repository and avoid calling Resolve inside controllers or services?

Thanks.

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Why do you have more than one Repository? Do you access different datasources? Just curious... –  Yves M. Oct 4 '11 at 12:38
    
@Yves M.: I have one repository per aggregate root in my domain layer. I have one data source, but hypothetically this approach supports each aggregate root to be on it's own data source. –  Intruder Oct 4 '11 at 15:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have already registered IRepository1-3, so you can get Service1 instance simply calling

container.Resolve<Service1>()

Calling container.Resolve<Controller1>() will automatically resolve dependencies and will create instance of type Controller1.

Sample:

public interface IRepository1 { }
public interface IRepository2 { }
public interface IRepository3 { }

public class ConcreteRepository1 : IRepository1 { }
public class ConcreteRepository2 : IRepository2 { }
public class ConcreteRepository3 : IRepository3 { }

public class Service1
{
    private IRepository1 repo1;
    private IRepository2 repo2;

    public Service1(IRepository1 repo1, IRepository2 repo2)
    {
        this.repo1 = repo1;
        this.repo2 = repo2;
    }
}

public class Service2
{
    private IRepository1 repo1;
    private IRepository2 repo2;

    public Service2(IRepository1 repo1, IRepository3 repo3)
    {
        this.repo1 = repo1;
        this.repo2 = repo2;
    }
}

public class Controller1
{
    private Service1 srv1;
    private Service2 srv2;

    public Controller1(Service1 srv1, Service2 srv2)
    {
        this.srv1 = srv1;
        this.srv2 = srv2;
    }
}

Resolving:

var container = new UnityContainer();
container.RegisterType<IRepository1, ConcreteRepository1>();
container.RegisterType<IRepository2, ConcreteRepository2>();
container.RegisterType<IRepository3, ConcreteRepository3>();

var controller = container.Resolve<Controller1>();

EDIT:

public interface IRepository { }
public class Repository : IRepository { }

public class Service
{
    //[InjectionConstructor]
    public Service()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Parameterless constructor called");
    }

    public Service(IRepository repository)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Contructor with IRepository called");
    }
}

private static void Main()
{
    var container = new UnityContainer();
    container.RegisterType<IRepository, Repository>();
    var service = container.Resolve<Service>();
    container.RegisterType<Service>(new InjectionConstructor());
    var service2 = container.Resolve<Service>();
}

Output:

Contructor with IRepository called
Parameterless constructor called

So, when we haven't registered Service (in other words, it has default resolving behavior), Unity constructs Service using greediest constructor by default. When you specify new InjectionConstructor(), this tells Unity to use parameterless constructor. The same behavior can be received if you mark constructor (in this case public Service()) with InjectionConstructorAttribute.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, thanks. And I was trying to register all controllers' types with the code below and when I removed it everything worked: var controllerTypes = from t in Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes() where typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(t) select t; foreach (Type t in controllerTypes) { container.RegisterType(t, new TransientLifetimeManager(), new InjectionConstructor()); } –  Intruder Oct 4 '11 at 15:12
    
So it looks like in this case all services/controllers types get kind of autoregistered with Unity, right? Is there a way I can disable this "autoregistration" and manually register each type/instance one by one or all together? –  Intruder Oct 4 '11 at 16:29
    
@Intruder, Sure, you can, without setting any "disable autoresolving" option. What exception did you catch? –  Kirill Polishchuk Oct 4 '11 at 16:53
    
When I manually register controllers with code provided in my first comment to your answer I get "<ControllerName> does not have a constructor that takes the parameters (). Source : Microsoft.Practices.Unity" exception –  Intruder Oct 4 '11 at 17:18
    
@Intruder, That is because you pass new InjectionConstructor() without parameters, therefore Unity tries to resolve Controller class using parameterless constructor, and as I see, your Controller constructor has 2 parameters. What is main purpose of register types by yourself? –  Kirill Polishchuk Oct 4 '11 at 17:29

surely just the following -

container.RegisterType<Service1>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), new InjectionConstructor());

and the same for Service2. The IoC container will construct the objects for you

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