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Say I have a function with template type T and two other classes A and B.

template <typename T>
void func(const T & t)
{
    ...........
    //check if T == A do something
    ...........
    //check if T == B do some other thing
}

How can I do these two checks (without using Boost library)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you literally just want a boolean to test whether T == A, then you can use is_same, available in C++11 as std::is_same, or prior to that in TR1 as std::tr1::is_same:

const bool T_is_A = std::is_same<T, A>::value;

You can trivially write this little class yourself:

template <typename, typename> struct is_same { static const bool value = false;};
template <typename T> struct is_same<T,T> { static const bool value = true;};

Often though you may find it more convenient to pack your branching code into separate classes or functions which you specialize for A and B, as that will give you a compile-time conditional. By contrast, checking if (T_is_A) can only be done at runtime.

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1  
What do you mean, only done at runtime? is_same<T,A>::value is an integer constant expression. Code in if(T_is_A) is likely to be subject to dead code removal in a decent compiler, that happens before runtime. The problem is that the code in both branches still has to compile before it's eliminated. –  Steve Jessop Oct 4 '11 at 12:56
    
@SteveJessop: Well, that optimization is a detail... the main point is as you say, though, that all the branch code has to be valid code, which is quite a restriction. By contrast, specialized templates aren't required to make sense unless they're actually instantiated. –  Kerrek SB Oct 4 '11 at 13:01
    
This solution has an advantage against already proposed ones, cause if "do something" and "do some other thing" were define a variable as a double and define a variable as int, the function specialization technic will not work as those variable would be local for those functions. Thanks for nice solution! –  Narek Oct 5 '11 at 5:47

Create function templates with specializations, that will do the thing you want.

template <class T>
void doSomething() {}

template <>
void doSomething<A>() { /* actual code */ }

template <class T>
void doSomeOtherThing() {}

template <>
void doSomeOtherThing<B>() { /* actual code */ }

template <typename T>
void func(const T & t)
{
    ...........
    //check if T == A do something
    doSomething<T>();
    ...........
    //check if T == B do some other thing
    doSomeOtherThing<T>();
}
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If you omit the definition of the primary template altogether, template <class> void doSomething();, then you'll get a nice compile-time error if the type is neither A nor B. –  Kerrek SB Oct 4 '11 at 12:51
    
@KerrekSB: Actually, in this case, you'd get a compile time error regardless of T, because the specialization would fail to find its primary template. That's why both are included :) –  jpalecek Oct 4 '11 at 12:54
    
Indeed, you'd have to omit the general definition and add a do-nothing definition for doSomething<B> and doSomeOtherThing<A>. –  Steve Jessop Oct 4 '11 at 12:58
    
Yeah, I misread the OP's question as a "switch" on T, but that's not actually what was asked for. Never mind :-S –  Kerrek SB Oct 4 '11 at 13:00
    
@SteveJessop: why? I don't understand. –  jpalecek Oct 4 '11 at 13:06

If you want to have a special implementation of func for some parameter type, simply create an overload specific for that type:

template <typename T>
void func(const T & t) {
   // generic code
}

void func(const A & t) {
   // code for A
}
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