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I have a pointer which points to some data. Now I have created a similar pointer. Now this new pointer is assigned to the old one. If i delete the old one what will happen?

A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
a = NULL;

what will happen to both "a" and "b"?

Moreover, if I do following things:

A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
delete a;

And also I want to know what happens to pointer when we assign is NULL.

A* a = new A();
a = NULL;

does a still points to some memory or it points to nothing?

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2  
@sehe: No, it points to NULL, which may or may not be 0x0, depending on the architecture. –  Hasturkun Oct 4 '11 at 12:55
1  
@Hasturkun: FUD. In C++, NULL is 0 (from the horses mouth: www2.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html#null) –  sehe Oct 4 '11 at 12:58
2  
@sehe: yes, null is 0 in C++. Doesn't mean that a null pointer points to address 0x0 though. 2003 §4.10: "A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression (5.19) rvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero. A null pointer constant can be converted to a pointer type; the result is the null pointer value of that type and is distinguishable from every other value of pointer to object or pointer to function type." Says nothing about the address a null pointer value points to. –  Mat Oct 4 '11 at 13:16
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@sehe: that's not what Stroustrup is saying. The value of the NULL macro is 0, but the value of a null pointer is implementation-defined. An implementation might set a pointer to some other value when you assign NULL to it. And I really don't see what saying FUD has to do with anything. –  jalf Oct 4 '11 at 13:19
1  
@Cipi: When converted to a pointer, a zero-valued integer literal is treated as a "null pointer constant", and translated into whatever value the platform uses to represent a null pointer. This will be a zero-valued address on most current platforms, but doesn't have to be. In other contexts, it's treated as a zero-valued integer (hence 1 * NULL == 0, as you say). –  Mike Seymour Oct 4 '11 at 13:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted
A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
a = NULL;

After this, b still points to the object allocated in the first line. a now points to nothing. You can still "use" the object via the b pointer, and you can delete the object via delete b;.
You can delete a; here - it will have no effect (since a is NULL), but it is safe and will not lead to undefined behavior.

A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
delete a;

After the delete, the object that a and b used to point to no longer exists. a and b are therefore no longer valid pointers, and you can't do anything with them that uses their value. In particular, trying to derefence either pointer will lead to undefined behavior. (But you can reuse the variables, if you make them point to a valid object.)

A* a = new A();
a = NULL;

You have just leaked the object created in the first line. a no longer points to anything, and you don't have a handle on that object so you can't delete it. So, it's a plain old memory leak.
(As in the first case, you can delete a; after the a = NULL; line, but it will have no effect, the memory is still leaked.)

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A point can be added that, delete/free on NULL is safe and doesn't lead to UB for sake of completeness. –  iammilind Oct 4 '11 at 12:55
    
Concerning the second case, it's not really accurate to say that a and b point to the same deleted object, since once it has been deleted, there is no object. According to the standard, after the delete, both a and b are invalid pointers, and just reading the pointer value (as in a != NULL) is undefined behavior. –  James Kanze Oct 4 '11 at 13:38
    
@JamesKanze: thanks, I didn't think enough about that case. Amended that paragraph, I think it's accurate now. –  Mat Oct 4 '11 at 14:05
    
@Mat Looks good. In practice, of course, about the only modern hardware where you might have a problem just reading a pointer is an Intel, and neither Windows nor Linux support the operations which could cause it, so you probably won't encounter problems until you dereference. On the other hand, if you write through the pointer, there's a chance that some other object will have come to exist at that location, and you'll modify it. Or you might corrupt the free space arena. Crashing immediately would be preferable. –  James Kanze Oct 4 '11 at 16:22
    
@JamesKanze: agreed. Possibly the worst bug you could get is if an actual A object was rebuilt in that exact same spot from somewhere else. You've got pretty much no chance of your OS giving you a clue with a segfault, and all operations should just work on the object, only it's not the object you thought it was :-) Nasty. –  Mat Oct 4 '11 at 16:29
A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
a = NULL;

what will happen to both "a" and "b"?

a will be NULL, and b is unmodified

A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
delete a;

*a has been deleted, and b became invalid (you must not dereference b (*b) any more past that point).

And also I want to know what happens to pointer when we assign is NULL.

A* a = new A();
a = NULL;

*a is not deleted, so the memory is leaked. The memory cannot be freed anymore (unless you had a copy of the pointer somewhere else, but the code doesn't show that).

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what if i assign any new pointer to a and then make a as null. and then delete a. –  Apoorva sahay Oct 4 '11 at 12:58
    
@Apoorvasahay: that doesn't make a lot of sense. You cannot [1] "assign any new pointer to a" or "make a as null" and then [2] delete a. In fact you cannot 'delete a'. You can only delete *a. You need a the address of *a (a pointer or a reference to take the address of) in order to be able to delete it. –  sehe Oct 4 '11 at 13:01
A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
a = NULL;

b keeps on pointing to A. a points to address 0x0, dereferencing it will cause a segfault.

A* a = new A();
A* b = a;
delete a;

both a and b points to the address space where A once was instanciated. Now that A is deleted, you should neither dereference a nor b as it might segfault.

A* a = new A();
a = NULL;

Now a points to address 0x0 and A is lost in cyberspace. You leaked memory.


a bit late on that one. again.

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1  
a points to 0x0 is technically incorrect, a null pointer doesn't have to point to address 0, that's an implementation detail. Also A is a type, not an object. Nothing can "point to A", but things can point to instances of A. –  Mat Oct 4 '11 at 13:09
    
Totally agree. That makes me late and lame. –  Laurent' Oct 4 '11 at 13:11

@apoorva "what if i assign any new pointer to a and then make a as null. and then delete a." it will have no effet..i.e you wont free the memory occupied by new A(),simply because a=null and you are trying to delete a; which now contains NULL.

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