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I'm using git here and there when I need some basic VCS functionality, but I've yet to fully understand how certain things work in Git.

Git, unlike SVN, is decentralized so that I could start a repository in one place and work with it locally, and then push my changes to another repository, at least that's how I understand it.

I'd like to know a few key things:

  1. If I want to create a new repository on my local machine, and than push (?) it to the server (it either has or doesn't this repo already), what are the actions needed?

  2. Do I need a web-server to interact with remote repos?

  3. How do I push/pull from/to a server that I have SSH access to?

Hopefully the reply would be short and to the point - man pages are great by they don't always convey what they need and sometimes have info that I don't need. So I hope you'll forgive me and my question even if it was asked/answer many times before.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Before anything else, understand how to configure ssh access (in general, not just for git) to your server, such that you can run something like:

ssh myserver uptime

And have it run the remote command without prompting you for a password. This will make your life with git much more pleasant.

If I want to create a new repository on my local machine, and than push (?) it to the server (it either has or doesn't this repo already), what are the actions needed?

On the remote server:

  • Create the target repository:

    $ mkdir -p path/to/repo.git
    $ cd path/to/repo.git
    $ git init --bare
    

On your local system:

  • Create your repository...

    $ mkdir myrepo

    $ cd myrepo

    $ git init

    ...and commit some changes.

    $ git add a-file-i-editied

    $ git commit -m 'this is a change'

  • Add a remote -- i.e., a reference to a remote repository:

    $ git remote add origin you@yourserver:path/to/repo.git

    Where you is your userid on the remote server and yourserver is the hostname (or ip address) of the remote server.

  • Push your changes to the remote repository:

    $ git push origin master

    Where origin is the name you have your remote in the previous step, and master is the branch that you're pushing.

Do I need a web-server to interact with remote repos?

Note the lack of any web server in the previous example. Git can operate over http/https, but it is more often used over ssh. Git also provides a native git protocol that can be used for providing anonymous read-only access to repositories; the git-daemon implements this protocol.

How do I push/pull from/to a server that I have SSH access to?

This is pretty much the example I've provided, but let me know if you would like more detail in any of the steps.

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Thanks for the quick reply - for your first paragraph I followed this: csua.berkeley.edu/~ranga/notes/ssh_nopass.html and edit the ssh config file by reading some of this openbsd.org/cgi-bin/… –  Eli Oct 4 '11 at 13:43
    
What is the "origin" for remote repos? how it is used in other examples? –  Eli Oct 4 '11 at 13:49
1  
"origin" is just a label applied to a particular remote repository. You could just have easily called it "public" or "github" or "frank". So the remote repository may not have an "origin" unless it is associated with yet another remote repository. –  larsks Oct 4 '11 at 14:10
    
@larks it makes a lot more sense now. Thanks! –  Eli Oct 6 '11 at 23:41

Here is an amazing git basic for newbs, it is spread over in two parts. Have a look, it starts from very basic of what and how, and in not more than 20 minutes, you will know how to go for using git in daily usage. Git Basic for Newbs - 1 and Git Basic for newbs - 2

I found them really helpful.

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gitcasts is a fantastic source for git beginners. It covers everything you need to know, from setup, to workflow.

You can't get more "short and to the point" than this =)

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Thanks, will check it out when I get the chance –  Eli Oct 4 '11 at 13:46

You also have good tutorials on the help pages of Github. From initializing your environment regarding ssh to creating a local repository and send it to Github.

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Just one comment to this

Read the ProGit book, it explains most daily used features, with a nice and easy theoretical part (which will help you avoid major WTF's afterwards).

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