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I've a code like following:

class B;

class A
{
  A()
  {
  }
  bool MethodA()
  {
    B *pB = new B();
    bool bRet = pB->SomeFunction();
    // remaining logic;
    return bRet;
  }
  ~A(){}
};

I need to write tests for MethodA. So I think I need to break the dependency on class B. What is the best way to do it? If it was a member variable, I could have injected a stub via constructor. Is there any solution that doesn't involve change in production code? If a change is necessary, what's the best way?

I use NUnit and is working on some unmanaged code here. Please help!

edit: There is another headache that I missed! class B is a C++ class which I shouldn't change its implementation. class A is in C++/CLI, which acts as wrapper to B. So I think that inhibits the probability of an Interface for B as I cannot touch B.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. There is no solution that doesn't include changing that design, mostly because that design is bad. A and its dependency B are tightly coupled, which makes as bad as it gets in terms of object-oriented programming: you need to invert the control of dependencies. Testing is only one reason why that design is bad, but it's not the only one. Portability, flexibility, separation of concerns, are other.

The best way (the only good way) to make it testable, and to make it better, is dependency injection. You need to inject B into A, using either a constructor (that takes an interface to B as a parameter) or a setter. And whoever controls A (and does a new A()) should pass the dependency B to it (new A(new B()), or A.setB(new B())).

Once that is done, unit-testing the method will become very easy.

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Please check the edit. I'm not allowed to change B (which actually resides in another module), so I think I cannot use an Interface/Abstract Base class. –  Ragesh Chakkadath Oct 4 '11 at 14:08
1  
Hmm that certainly adds some complexity, but if you really want to do it it's still possible: You can use a wrapper class (Say C) that delegates all its calls to B, and you would inject an Interface to C into A, removing all references of B from A. The price of that is another tight coupling between C and B, but if the main point was testing methodA, then you're good to go. –  Guillaume Oct 4 '11 at 14:16
    
Hmm, that sounds like a solution. But the class A is already a wrapper :) But its doing some data type conversion from C# object to some thing that class B understands. I'm now confused! Is another wrapper worth or should I refrain from testing such minor(?) details? :) –  Ragesh Chakkadath Oct 4 '11 at 14:35

You can't do this without making a change, but you could do something like:

class A
{
  A()
  {
  }


  A(B *b)
  {
     pB = b;
  }

  B *pB;

  bool MethodA()
  {
    if (*pB == null) {
      *pB = new B();
    }
    bool bRet = pB->SomeFunction();
    // remaining logic;
    return bRet;
  }
  ~A(){}
};

At least in C# which is what I think you are writing. Haven't dealt much with pointers, so I'm not sure if I got the syntax right, but basically the idea is to do lazy initialization of pB to allow you to inject a dependency if you'd like but not break the current behavior. You could get a bit fancier and make the alternate constructor for A internal and then use the InternalsVisibleTo attribute to only show it to your test classes.

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Pls check the edit! there's one more head ache that I missed. Sorry! –  Ragesh Chakkadath Oct 4 '11 at 14:10
    
Even though we write a new constructor and let it pass a pointer to the object of class B, how can we inject a stub? –  Ragesh Chakkadath Oct 4 '11 at 14:12
2  
Ugh. I've got about zero seat time with C++/CLI and C++/CLI integration with c#, there might be some cool party stunts one can pull with pointers to make this go but I wouldn't know enough about that. What you really should do from the C# side is to wrap the entire C++ class in an interface and only directly reference the interface, not the underlying class. –  Wyatt Barnett Oct 4 '11 at 14:17
    
Thats like a wrapper between wrapper and the class :) But as my current "wrapper" is having some minor logic of some conversion, I'm confused whether I really need to verify that. –  Ragesh Chakkadath Oct 4 '11 at 14:38

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