Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a makefile in bash and I have a target in which I try to find if a file exists and even though I think the syntax is correct, i still gives me an error.

Here is the script that I am trying to run

read: 
        if [ -e testFile] ; then \ 
        cat testFile\ 
        fi

I am using tabs so that is not a problem.

The error is (when I type in: "make read")

if [ -e testFile] ; then \
        cat testFile \
        fi
/bin/sh: Syntax error: end of file unexpected (expecting "fi")
make: *** [read] Error 2
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try adding a semicolon after cat testFile. For example:

read: 
    if [ -e testFile ] ; then  cat testFile ; fi

alternatively:

read:
    test -r testFile && cat testFile
share|improve this answer
    
the alternate solution works but I have to use the if..then syntax. adding a semicolon does not seem to solve the issue. –  Jaelebi Apr 19 '09 at 6:09
    
Weird. I tried it the first time with semicolon and it didnt work. th second time I ran it it worked.Thanks –  Jaelebi Apr 19 '09 at 6:14
    
Just a note to self: I originally wrote plain multiline bash statements in the makefile, and had the same failure - and as this answer notes, the trick is to have the makefile recognize the shell command as a single line; hence I'd need both semicolon ; (to separate shell commands) and backslash `\` (to escape the subsequent newline) to get it to work... Cheers! –  sdaau Aug 3 '11 at 13:33
add comment

I ran into the same issue. This should do it:

file:
    @if [ -e scripts/python.exe ] ; then \
    echo TRUE ; \
    fi
share|improve this answer
add comment

I also met this problem.

And the reason is that I added some comments after the "\".

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.