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I have InnoDB tables that we access via a PDO API from PHP. Now, I've read that for INSERT and UPDATE statements, it would probably be a good idea to use InnoDB transactions. Since auto commit is set to 1, it would commit the query as soon as it is made. So if I group a bunch of INSERTs together and do:

$GLOBALS['dbh']->query('BEGIN');
[multiple INSERT queries here]
$GLOBALS['dbh']->query('COMMIT');

It's supposed to be more efficient.

Questions:

  1. Is this correct?
  2. I also read that certain APIs make use of their own transactions and was wondering if anyone knew if PDO does this. In other words, should I worry about doing this at all or let PDO handle transactions?
  3. In the case that PDO does handle transactions, am I screwing everything up with the above queries?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

Is this correct?

Yes.
Small nitpick: I would use START TRANSACTION instead of begin, it is the same, but more self-evident.

I also read that certain APIs make use of their own transactions and was wondering if anyone knew if PDO does this. In other words, should I worry about doing this at all or let PDO handle transactions?

PDO does not magically know when you transactions start and end, so you will still have to start and end your transactions if auto-commit =1 and you want to include more than 1 statement in a transaction.
You should not worry, what you are doing above is fine.

In the case that PDO does handle transactions, am I screwing everything up with the above queries?

No.

So if I group a bunch of INSERTs together and do: {see code above} It's supposed to be more efficient.

Not very much, if you can cramp all your inserts into a single statement that would be more efficient.
And if you can replace the insert with a load data infile that would be more efficient still.

Example:

INSERT INTO table1 (field1, field2) VALUES (1,1),(2,5),(5,6);
-- Much more efficient than 3 separate inserts 
-- (and you don't need to start and end the transaction :-)
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Thanks for the reply. But what I'm hearing you say is that the above is not really helping and it would be almost the same if I leave it without the BEGIN and COMMIT? The queries I have are separate INSERT INTO because they are encased in IF statements so I can't bunch them up together. So really, the BEGIN and COMMIT are not helping at all? –  kakubei Oct 4 '11 at 14:48
    
@kakubei, where did you get that idea, the start transaction and commit are very useful, just not very much more efficient. –  Johan Oct 4 '11 at 14:53
    
Ok, now I'm confused. What's the usefulness of BEGIN and COMMIT in this scenario? Is it better to use them than to let the auto commit do its thing? If so, why? –  kakubei Oct 5 '11 at 9:34
    
Any comments on the above? –  kakubei Oct 6 '11 at 15:17
    
@kakubei See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Database_transaction –  Johan Oct 6 '11 at 15:25

Theoretically it's correct, but the "official" way to do it, is to use PDO's built-in methods for that: http://www.php.net/manual/en/pdo.begintransaction.php

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