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In my project I heavily make use of TPL, and I decide to design a generic way of producing tasks, instead of calling new Task(Action);, new Task(Action<object>, object); or Task.Factory.StartNew(Action) etc. explicitly. I will have a function like

void SpawnTask<A,B>( Action<A,B> action, A a, B b) { ... }
void SpawnTask<A,B,C>( Action<A,B,C> action, A a, B b, C c) { ... }

for creating and starting tasks.

Also I need to run a mandatory method after each task completed. Thus I have to wrap the actual method I want to run in another method like

void RuncTask(Action action)
{
  action();
  MandatoryMethod();
}

So far I come up with two different approaches.
First, using anonymous delegates:

void SpawnTask<A,B>(Action<A,B> action, A a, B b)
{
  A dummyA = a; // To localize the parameters.
  B dummyB = b;
  var methodDelegate = delegate { action(dummyA,dummyB); };
  var taskDelegate = delegate { RunTask(methodDelegate); };
  Task.Factory.StartNew( taskDelegate );
}

void RuncTask(Action action)
{
  action();
  MandatoryMethod();
}

Second, using tuple:

void SpawnTask<A,B>(Action<A,B> action, A a, B b)
{
  Tuple<Action<A,B>, A, B> tpl = Tuple.Create(action, a, b);
  Action<object> act = RunTask<A,B>;
  Task.Factory.StartNew( act, tpl );
}

void RuncTask<A,B>(object obj)
{
  var tpl = (Tuple<Action<A, B>, A, B>)param;
  tpl.Item1(tpl.Item2,tpl.Item3);
  MandatoryMethod();
}

I like the first one because, it is simpler. The second has casting, requires other generic RunTask methods to be implemented for different number of parameters. But I do not know if creating too much anonymous delegates can cause side effects.

Which one do you prefer? Why? Or what other solutions do you have?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, you can always create an extension method on Action<TA,TB> ... and you should use continuations rather than wrapped method calls to implement the behavior of always performing another action when the task completes:

public static class TaskExtensions
{
    public static void RunTask<TA,TB>( Action<TA,TB> action, TA a, TB b )
    {
        Task newTask = new Task( () => action(a,b) );
        newTask.ContinueWith( MandatoryMethod );
        newTask.Start();
    }

    // if you need to support other signature (more parameters) you would need to
    // create additional overloads of RunTask with more generic parameters...
    public static void RunTask( Action action );
    public static void RunTask<TA>( Action<TA> action, TA a );
    // etc ...

    private static void MandatoryMethod( Task t ) { /* your continuation logic */ }
}

Now you can use this code as follows:

public void SomeMethod( int x, int y ) { ... }

// later...
Action<int,int> myAction = SomeMethod;
myAction.RunTask( 1, 2 );

Note that in the above implementation the continuation method (MandatoryMethod) will be executed asynchronously. If you desire synchronous execution (as is implemented in your example), you can use the overload of ContinueWith that takes a TaskContinuationOptions and pass in TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously.

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Frankly, I mot quite sure what you are trying to accomplish with that. What advantage over directly using Task constructor or Task.Factory are you hoping to achieve?

As for a "mandatory method" that needs to execute after task finishes, look at continuations (e.g. Task.ContinueWith).

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Maybe the question is not clear enough. The point is to create a task for all types of void methods generically. –  ali_bahoo Oct 4 '11 at 15:02
1  
@sad_man Either I'm missing something obvious here or you are ;) Why can't you just pass any delegate to Task.Factory.StartNew? You do know that you can wrap a delegate with any number of parameters in a peremeter-less lambda and present it to TaskFactory.StartNew, right? BTW, how will you wait on task completion if SpawnTask does not return the newly created task (nor you are using child tasks)? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Oct 4 '11 at 15:13
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