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I want a more C++/Linux oriented book. I do have some basics of multithreading/parallel programming under my belt, but I want to both brush my skills and improve them further.

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closed as off topic by CoolBeans, Robert Harvey Oct 4 '11 at 18:35

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There is C++ Concurrency in Action early access, preoder, but it's C++ oriented, not pthreads-oriented. –  Cubbi Oct 4 '11 at 14:58
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I like Bill Lewis and Daniel Berg "Pthreads Primer" –  Tio Pepe Oct 4 '11 at 15:17
    
Why are you guys so shy posting these as answers? They're proper answers! –  wilhelmtell Oct 4 '11 at 15:26
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For whatever it's worth, the one book I'd recommend for serious study would be: amazon.com/Art-Multiprocessor-Programming-Maurice-Herlihy/dp/…. Yes, the examples are in Java - but the material applies to any language, not just Java. IMHO... –  paulsm4 Oct 4 '11 at 15:44
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@wilhelmtell Mine is a comment because I don't think it answers the question (OP expects pthreads programming, which is quite different from C++11 threads/atomics programming). –  Cubbi Oct 4 '11 at 15:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The reference for pthreads is Programming with POSIX Threads, by David Butenhof; in addition to the specifics of pthreads, it presents a lot of very good information about concurrency in general. It is, however, strictly C, and it doesn't really say much about parallel programming. Still, I'd definitely recommend it.

There's also C++ Concurrency in Action: Practical Multithreading, by Anthony Williams. This is a very new book, and I haven't seen it yet, but the author played an important role in the standardization of threading, and I've seen articles by him, so I expect it will be very good.

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