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I am working on this site, and I have a requirement to make navigation menus that expand when you mouse over them, and that have white vertical bars that separate the entries. And all the way to the right would be the ability to search.

The site is: http://www.problemio.com and I am talking about the items that have the background image near the top of the screen that has the words "problems support"

I have this html for that div:

<div class="nav_bar">
<!-- connect buttons and menu go here -->
    <div class="nav">
        <div class="icons">

        </div>

        <div class="menusystem" id="site_nav">
            <ul class="main_menu_ul">
                <li class="main_menu_li"><a href="http://www.problemio.com/">Support</a>
                </li>

                <li class="main_menu_li"><a href="http://www.problemio.com/">Problems</a> 
                    <ul class="child_menu_ul">
                        <li class="first"><a href="http://www.problemio.com/">Categories</a></li>
                    </ul>
                </li>
            </ul>

            <form  name="form" method="post">
            Search: <input type="text" size="20"></input> 
            <input type="submit" class="button" value="Search"></input>         

    </div>
</div>

And I have this css for the nav_bar

.nav_bar
{
    background-image: url('http://www.problemio.com/img/ui/problemiomainbluebar.png');
    background-repeat: repeat-x;

    border-bottom: 1px solid #462c1f;
    border-top: 1px solid #462c1f;   

        margin-top: 5px;
}

/* styles for nav_bar: */ 
.nav_bar a
{
    z-index: 20;
    width:100%;
/*  background:#ffce2e; the comehike strip with orange */
/*  background:#2e6ea4; the comehike strip with blue  */

    color: white;   

    position: relative;
}

.nav_bar .nav 
{
    width:60em;
    height: 40px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 20;

}

.nav_bar .icons 
{
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    display: inline-block;
}

.nav_bar .icons div 
{
    display: inline-block;
    position: relative; 
    top: 10px;
    float:left;
}

.nav_bar .nav #site_nav 
{
    position: absolute;
    right: 0.5em;
    top: 0.2em;
    z-index: 20;
}

and this css for the

  • pieces that make up the dropdowns:

    .menusystem 
    {
        position: absolute;
        font-size: 1em;
    }
    
    .menusystem ul, .menusystem li 
    {
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
    }
    .menusystem li 
    {
        list-style: none outside none;
    }
    
    .menusystem ul 
    {
        list-style: none;
    /*
        -moz-border-radius: 14px;
        -webkit-border-radius: 14px;
    */
    
    }
    
    .menusystem ul li 
    {
        position: relative;
    /*
        -moz-box-shadow: 2px 2px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.4);
        -webkit-box-shadow: 2px 2px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.4);
        -moz-border-radius: 14px;
        -webkit-border-radius: 14px;
    */
    }
    
    .menusystem ul li ul 
    {
        display: none;
        position: absolute;
        top: 1.6em;
        right: 0;
        width: 10em;    
    }
    
    .menusystem li a {
        display: block;
        padding: 5px 10px;
         /* dark blue */
    /*  border: 1px solid #2e6ea4; */
        text-decoration: none;
    }
    
    .menusystem ul li.main_menu_li {
        float:right;
        width: 10em;
        margin-right:0.2em;
        text-align: center;
    }
    
    /* IE-Win (Holly hack) reads the list item line breaks, so lets hide those \*/
    * html ul li { float: left; }
    * html ul li a { height: 1%; }
    
    
    .menusystem li:hover ul, .menusystem li.mouseHover ul { 
        display: block;
    }
    
    .menusystem li ul.child_menu_ul li a
    {
        /*
        color: #fff;
        */
        color: #fff;
        /* light blue */
    /*  background: #7ba9c9;  */
    
            font-size: 80%;
        text-shadow: none;
        -moz-border-radius: 0px;
        -webkit-border-radius: 0px;
        border-bottom: 1px solid #2e6ea4;
        border-top: 0px;
        background: none repeat scroll 0 0 #2E6EA4;
    }
    .menusystem li ul.child_menu_ul li.first a
    {
        -moz-border-radius-topleft: 14px;
        -moz-border-radius-topright: 14px;
        -webkit-border-top-left-radius: 14px;
        -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 14px;
        -moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 0;
        -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 0;
        -webkit-border-bottom-left-radius: 0;
        -webkit-border-bottom-right-radius: 0;
        border-top: 1px solid #2e6ea4;
    }
    
    .menusystem li ul.child_menu_ul li.last a
    {
        -moz-border-radius-topleft: 0px;
        -moz-border-radius-topright: 0px;
        -webkit-border-top-left-radius: 0px;
        -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 0px;
            -moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 14px;
        -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 14px;
        -webkit-border-bottom-left-radius: 14px;
        -webkit-border-bottom-right-radius: 14px;
    }
    
    .menusystem li ul.child_menu_ul li.only a 
    {
        -moz-border-radius: 14px;
        -webkit-border-radius: 14px;
    
    }
    
    .menusystem li ul.child_menu_ul li a:hover {
        color: #ff0;
        background: #2e6ea4; 
    }
    
    /*.menusystem li.main_menu_li a */
    .menusystem ul.child_menu_ul a
    {
        color: #fff;
    /*
        background: -moz-linear-gradient(100% 100% 90deg, #668eb8, #2e6ea4 );
        background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0% 0%, 0% 100%, from(#668eb8), to(#2e6ea4));
    */
    
        text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.9);
        /*
        -moz-text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.9);
        -webkit-text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.9);
        -moz-border-radius: 14px;
        -webkit-border-radius: 14px;
    */
    }
    
    .menusystem li.main_menu_li a:hover 
    {
    /*      background-color: #2e6ea4; */
        color: #ff0;
    }
    
    ul li.spaced
    {   
        padding-bottom: 10px; 
        font-weight: normal;    
    }
    
  • share|improve this question
        
    Have you tried to implement this at all? –  Blender Oct 4 '11 at 15:00

    4 Answers 4

    up vote 7 down vote accepted

    Why not a simple border?

    #site_nav>ul>li+li {
        border-left: solid 2px white;
    }
    

    This adds a 2px-thick white border to the left of any li immediate sibling to a li (so, not the first) immediately inside a ul immediately inside #site_nav.

    share|improve this answer
        
    This is really the only constructive answer given on this page. –  Clive Oct 4 '11 at 15:11
        
    Would I be able to space out the border? I need it equally distributed between items by some amount specified by the designer. –  Genadinik Oct 4 '11 at 15:15
        
    Surely! Padding adds space between the border and the content, and margin adds space between the border and the "outside". (But getting it to work properly might be tough... because your css is not clean at all.) –  ANeves Oct 4 '11 at 15:20
        
    @ANeves which of my css isn't clean? the stuff for the uls and lis? Yeah I inherited that sort of - not sure how it is supposed to work :) –  Genadinik Oct 4 '11 at 15:38
        
    @Genadinik yeah, that and the as that spill out of their containing lis. Maybe this helps: htmldog.com/articles/suckerfish/dropdowns , and a pretty example. –  ANeves Oct 5 '11 at 8:14

    What do you mean by a "separator"? Just a line? If so, you could simply add a border-bottom property to the CSS for the <li> in question.

    share|improve this answer
        
    By a seperator, I mean a vertical white line evenly spaced between the items. –  Genadinik Oct 4 '11 at 15:03

    add an additional li in between each nav menu give it the class separator and style the separator class.

    <ul class="main_menu_ul">
     <li class="main_menu_li"><a href="http://www.problemio.com/">Support</a></li>
     <li class="main_menu_separator"></li>
     <li class="main_menu_li"><a href="http://www.problemio.com/">Problems</a> 
      <ul class="child_menu_ul">
       <li class="first"><a href="http://www.problemio.com/">Categories</a></li>
      </ul>
     </li>
    </ul>
    
    
    .main_menu_separator { width: (width of image); height: (height of menu); background-image: (separator image); }
    
    share|improve this answer
    1  
    That's a terrible idea, styling should be done with CSS not by adding extra markup to the page. –  Clive Oct 4 '11 at 15:09
        
    @Clive this gives granular control over the elements so that you can style them more effectively to meet the needs of the client. –  CBRRacer Oct 4 '11 at 15:11
        
    Regardless of whether or not it's easier, it's bad practice and semantically incorrect to do what you suggest. The answer's in your own statement: 'this gives granular control over the elements'. What do you think CSS does?! –  Clive Oct 4 '11 at 15:14
        
    Fair enough. I suppose he could do a background: url(image url) no-repeat right top; and set his background separator image there. –  CBRRacer Oct 4 '11 at 16:04

    If I were making a menu system, I would be using <div> elements instead of <ul> and <li>. Then, for a seperator, I need only put <hr /> and Voilà!

    Of course, most people seem fixated on using lists for menus...

    share|improve this answer
        
    but I think that wouldn't work with the mouse-over, right? There are dropdown menus when you mouse over the categories link –  Genadinik Oct 4 '11 at 15:05
        
    People are fixated on using lists for menus because it's correct to do so. A menu is a list of links...so semantically it should be marked up as a <ul> or <ol>. This helps those with screen readers identify a group of links as such, otherwise they just appear as random. HTML5 markup goes some way towards mitigating this with the introduction of the <nav> element, but I still believe it's semantically incorrect to use anything other than an HTML list element to markup a list. –  Clive Oct 4 '11 at 15:06
        
    -1: I strongly disagree with you. If you are writing a list, use an ul or a ol and then style it according to your wishes. but most importantly, why would you use hrs instead of border-bottom?? –  ANeves Oct 4 '11 at 15:06
        
    There's no reason not to use lists for menus -- <li> can be styled just as well as <div>. Also, it tends to look better in text-only browsers which don't handle CSS (and might sound better in text-to-speech browsers, though I have no personal experience with those). –  Ilmari Karonen Oct 4 '11 at 15:11

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