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Whenever I try to stop my service through the services manager, I get the following error and the service stays in a started state. "Could not stop the service on Local Computer. The service did not return an error. This could be an internal Windows error or an internal service error." I've had such trouble with this issue that I tried to follow the logic from Microsoft as best as I could. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb540474(v=vs.85).aspx There is a similar issue with this in .Net 1.1 that you'll find if you search; however, I'm not using the framweork at all.

void WINAPI serviceCtrlHandler(DWORD dwCtrl )
{

    switch(dwCtrl)
    {
        case SERVICE_CONTROL_STOP:
            ReportSvcStatus(SERVICE_STOP_PENDING, NO_ERROR, 0);
            SetEvent(stopEvent); 
            ReportSvcStatus(serviceStatus->dwCurrentState, NO_ERROR, 0);

            return;
        case SERVICE_CONTROL_INTERROGATE:
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }
}

void WINAPI startMain(DWORD argc, LPTSTR *argv)
{
    serviceStatusHandle = RegisterServiceCtrlHandler(SERVICE_NAME, serviceCtrlHandler);

    serviceStatus->dwServiceType = SERVICE_WIN32_OWN_PROCESS;
    serviceStatus->dwServiceSpecificExitCode = NO_ERROR;

    if (serviceStatusHandle == 0)
    {
        debug->DebugMessage(L"RegisterServiceCtrlHandler() failed, error: " + Error::GetErrorMessageW(GetLastError()));
        return;
    }

    ReportSvcStatus(SERVICE_START_PENDING, NO_ERROR, 3000);

    if (!SetServiceStatus(serviceStatusHandle, serviceStatus))
    {
        //debug->DebugMessage(L"SetserviceStatus() failed, error: " + Error::GetErrorMessageW(GetLastError()));
        //return;
    }

    stopEvent = CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);

    ReportSvcStatus(SERVICE_RUNNING, NO_ERROR, 0);

    boost::thread dust_main_thread(dust_main);

    while(1)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(stopEvent, INFINITE);

        ReportSvcStatus(SERVICE_STOPPED, NO_ERROR, 0);
        return;
    }

}

VOID ReportSvcStatus(DWORD dwCurrentState, DWORD dwWin32ExitCode, DWORD dwWaitHint)
{
    static DWORD dwCheckPoint = 1;

    serviceStatus->dwCurrentState = dwCurrentState;
    serviceStatus->dwWin32ExitCode = dwWin32ExitCode;
    serviceStatus->dwWaitHint = dwWaitHint;

    if (dwCurrentState == SERVICE_START_PENDING)
        serviceStatus->dwControlsAccepted = 0;
    else serviceStatus->dwControlsAccepted = SERVICE_ACCEPT_STOP;

    if ((dwCurrentState == SERVICE_RUNNING) || (dwCurrentState == SERVICE_STOPPED))
        serviceStatus->dwCheckPoint = 0;
    else 
        serviceStatus->dwCheckPoint = dwCheckPoint++;

    SetServiceStatus(serviceStatusHandle, serviceStatus);
}
share|improve this question
    
What does boost::thread dust_main_thread(dust_main); do ? Does it loop or spawn another thread ? –  user957902 Oct 4 '11 at 15:42
    
It waits for incomming pipe connections and handles requests. Either way, I should be able to take that line out of there and it should just wait for the stop event forever. –  Bluebaron Oct 4 '11 at 15:48
    
I am assuming that the serviceStatus variable is a global since I dont see it declared. The next line after your SetEvent is to report the value of serviceStatus->dwCurrentState. However, since order of execution after the SetEvent is not guarenteed, it is possible that you could report SERVICE_STOPPED and then SERVICE_STOPPED_PENDING again depending on where the thread context was switched. –  user957902 Oct 4 '11 at 16:09
    
Actually it should be guaranteed as long as the event is fired on the same thread. –  Bluebaron Oct 4 '11 at 16:29
    
The problem was a gaf on my part. Remote debugging cleared this issue up for me. The problem was that when my service was ending naturally it would call serviceCtrlHandler(SERVICE_STOP); which should be serviceCtrlHandler(SERVICE_CONTROL_STOP); This caused the program to exit without notifying the SCM. –  Bluebaron Oct 4 '11 at 16:33

1 Answer 1

Run the service and then attach the debugger to the running process. Put a breakpoint at the serviceCtrlHandler and after the WaitForSingleObject(stopEvent, INFINITE) -- make sure what you think should happen does.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay. I'm going to have to install VS on the remote computer to get the remote debugger. BBIAW. –  Bluebaron Oct 4 '11 at 15:43
    
The problem was a gaf on my part. Remote debugging cleared this issue up for me. The problem was that when my service was ending naturally it would call serviceCtrlHandler(SERVICE_STOP); which should be serviceCtrlHandler(SERVICE_CONTROL_STOP); This caused the program to exit without notifying the SCM. –  Bluebaron Oct 4 '11 at 16:32
    
@Bluebaron edit the original question with the solution so others may benefit from your gaf. –  Dennis Oct 4 '11 at 16:40

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