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I have seen the thread pool executor implementation and the rejected execution policies that it provides. However, I have a custom requirement - I want to have a call back mechanism where in I get notifications when the queue size limit is reached and say when the queue size reduces to say 80 % of the max allowed queue size.

public interface ISaturatedPoolObserver {
 void onSaturated(); // called when the blocking queue reaches the size limit
 void onUnsaturated(); // called when blocking queues size goes below the threshold.
}

I feel that this can be implemented by subclassing thread pool executor, but is there an already implemented version? I would be happy to add more details and my work so far as and when needed to provide clarity.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I wouldn't subclass the executor but I would subclass the BlockingQueue that is used by the executor. Something like the following should work. There are race conditions in the code around the checkUnsaturated() if you remove an entry and someone puts one back in. You might have to synchronize on the queue if these need to be perfect. Also, I have no idea what methods the executor implementations use so you might not need to override some of these.

public class ObservableBlockingQueue<E> extends LinkedBlockingQueue<E> {
     private ISaturatedPoolObserver observer;
     private int capacity;
     public ObservableBlockingQueue(ISaturatedPoolObserver observer,
         int capacity) {
         super(capacity);
         this.observer = observer;
         this.capacity = capacity;
    }
    @Override
    public boolean offer(E o) {
        boolean offered = super.offer(o);
        if (!offered) {
            observer.onSaturated();
        }
        return offered;
    }
    @Override
    public boolean offer(E o, long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException {
        boolean offered = super.offer(o, timeout, unit);
        if (!offered) {
            observer.onSaturated();
        }
        return offered;
    }
    @Override
    public E poll() {
        E e = super.poll();
        if (e != null) {
             checkUnsaturated();
        }
        return e;
    }
    @Override
    public E poll(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException {
        E e = super.poll(timeout, unit);
        if (e != null) {
             checkUnsaturated();
        }
        return e;
    }
    @Override
    public E take() throws InterruptedException {
        E e = super.take();
        checkUnsaturated();
        return e;
    }
    @Override
    public boolean remove(E e) throws InterruptedException {
        boolean removed = super.remove(e);
        if (removed) {
            checkUnsaturated();
        }
        return removed;
    }
    private void checkUnsaturated() {
        if (super.size() * 100 / capacity < UNSATURATED_PERCENTAGE) {
            observer.onUnsaturated();
        }
    }
}
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+1 for the answer; however, a small glitch with the solution is that the blocking queue's thread safety can be compromised if not implemented well. This is where ThreadPoolExecutors#beforeExecute and afterExecute can work but it might have its own shortcomings. –  Scorpion Oct 5 '11 at 5:32
    
Yeah, agreed. I mentioned that in my answer. Depends a lot on how exact you need the callbacks. It would be a lot easier to know which methods were used by the service. –  Gray Oct 5 '11 at 12:13
    
The methods, poll(), offer(), remove(), take() along with isEmpty, size, remainingCapacity, drainTo are used; the former being the relevant one's. I have also based on the advice attempted a full fledged answer which should also take care of thread safety, any suggestions or feedback on that? –  Scorpion Oct 5 '11 at 12:27
    
I guess it's a little rude to take 90% of my answer and tweak it and submit it as your own. If you wanted to comment on it and say I missed the drainTo or whatever then fine but my answer got you to your solution. Right? –  Gray Oct 5 '11 at 14:17
    
You are right; and my answer just elaborates your answer and tries to cater to thread safety concern. I will edit it to mention that it is an extension of your answer. I will delete if you still find it rude, sorry. –  Scorpion Oct 5 '11 at 16:21

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