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Is there a preferred practice for passing constructor parameters? In particular if those constructor parameters are used to initialize member variables.

A simplified example.

class Example
{
public:
   Example( /*type-1*/ str, /*type-2*/ v ):
      m_str( str ),
      m_v( v )
   { }

   /* other methods */

private:
   std::string m_str;
   std::complex<float> m_v;
};

The options are:

  • pass-by-value, then std::move the object into the member.
  • const&, then copy the parameter into the member.
  • &&, then initialize the member with the parameter.

What should be my default/preferred parameter passing style?
Does it change with different parameter types?

My intuition says use rvalue-references, but I'm not sure I understand all the pros and cons.

share|improve this question
    
"&&, then initialize the member with the parameter" Example(std::string&& str) : m_str(str) {} will make a copy not a move. Just to make that clear. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 4 '11 at 16:14
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: wouldn't the compiler use std::string's move constructor? Why would it prefer to copy instead of move? Would std::forward fix this? –  deft_code Oct 4 '11 at 16:24
1  
Because named rvalue references are lvalues. Example(std::string&& str) : m_str(std::move(str)) {} moves. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 4 '11 at 16:28
    
@deft_code @RMartinhoFernandes This is a safety thing. If there is a name to an object, then it is not always safe to do a move since the moved from object can be accessed afterwards. std::move is a way to tell the compiler that you know what you are doing and that the object will not be accessed afterwards (or that it is safe to be accessed afterwards). Also, if you std::move in the ctor initializer list, you should take care to use the class member in the body, not the ctor parameter. –  Michael Price Oct 31 '11 at 17:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Option 1:

class Example
{
public:
   Example( std::string str, const std::complex<float>& v ):
      m_str( std::move(str) ),
      m_v( v )
   { }

   /* other methods */

private:
   std::string m_str;
   std::complex<float> m_v;
};

This has pretty good performance and is easy to code. The one place it falls a little short of the optimum is when you bind an lvalue to str. In this case you execute both a copy construction and a move construction. The optimum is only a copy construction. Note though that a move construction for a std::string should be very fast. So I would start with this.

However if you really need to pull the last cycles out of this for performance you can do:

Option 2:

class Example
{
public:
   Example( const std::string& str, const std::complex<float>& v ):
      m_str( str ),
      m_v( v )
   { }
   Example( std::string&& str, const std::complex<float>& v ):
      m_str( std::move(str) ),
      m_v( v )
   { }

   /* other methods */

private:
   std::string m_str;
   std::complex<float> m_v;
};

The main disadvantage of this option is having to overload/replicate the constructor logic. Indeed this formula will become unrealistic if you have more than one or two parameters that you need to overload between const& and &&.

share|improve this answer
    
I use option 2 when I pass only at most object with nontrivial constructors. I use option 1 if I have more than one object with a nontrivial constructor. –  Mooing Duck Oct 4 '11 at 16:19
    
What happens if the user passes a const& string to the && constructor? I thought that it would create a copy. That copy could be then moved into the std::string member. –  deft_code Oct 4 '11 at 16:26
1  
@deft_code: That won't compile. An rvalue-ref parameter will only accept rvalues. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 4 '11 at 16:35
1  
Overload resolution will select the constructor taking a const std::string&. One can not explicitly select a constructor. One gets what one gets via overload resolution based on the parameters passed to the constructor. –  Howard Hinnant Oct 4 '11 at 16:36

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