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Let's say I have three conditions: Condition1, Condition2, Condition3. If all the conditions are fulfilled then the method/function returns true else false.

Technique one:

     function check(){
        if(Condition1 is true AND Condition2 is true AND Condition3 is true){
           return true;
        }
        return false;
     }

Technique two:

      function check(){
         if(Condition1 is false){
             return false;
         }
         if(Condition2 is false){
             return false;
         }
         if(Condition3 is false){
             return false;
        }

         return true;
      }

Which of the techniques would be better?

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closed as not constructive by Quentin, Marc B, user113716, PengOne, David Z Oct 4 '11 at 17:56

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It depends on your context. In this particular case I think the first technique is better. – MeLight Oct 4 '11 at 16:17
    
Better in which way? Both blocks do exactly the same. – Dennis Oct 4 '11 at 16:18
    
Can return condition1 ? (condition2 ? (condition 3 ? true : false) : false) : false be technique 3? – Xavi López Oct 4 '11 at 16:22
1  
@XaviLópez Sure, it could, if you want to make people's eyes bleed. – Dave Newton Oct 4 '11 at 16:23
    
In return (Condition1 && Condition2 && Condition3); all the conditions has to be checked. But in technique 2, if a false condition arises then the number of conditions to check can vary from 1 - 3. So, in that situation won't technique 2 be better? – Harke Oct 4 '11 at 17:35
up vote 5 down vote accepted

"Better" is subjective.

return (Condition1 && Condition2 && Condition3); // "Better" yet?

Depends on what's more readable, and maintainable, in the non-contrived code.

Personally, I'm a fan of returning as early as possible, when it makes sense to do so and it increases readability.

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+1. Although this way would be objectively better taking into account fast-failing of the whole condition in conjunctive forms, as @porco pointed out – Xavi López Oct 4 '11 at 16:32
    
@XaviLópez It's only "objectively" better if the conditions can actually be accurately represented as above and the speed/readability ratio is worth the tradeoff. If the conditions aren't neatly wrapped up in a single variable, I'd say it isn't better, since you'd need to encapsulate them anyway. It's hard to tell from contrived examples, though :) – Dave Newton Oct 4 '11 at 16:39

I would use technique 3:

 function check() {
    return Condition1 && Condition2 && Condition3;
 }

No need to compare to true or even have an if block.

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function check(){
    return (Condition1 && Condition2 && Condition3);
}

I think it's better to have a unique return statement in a method.

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3  
Why do you think so? And there is no AND is JS. – svick Oct 4 '11 at 16:19
    
Oh yes, I reused his example, without even thinking :) It's && of course (now edited) – Guillaume Oct 4 '11 at 16:23
1  
@svick I think in general it's true, but only when the method's structure and purpose is more readable with the single return. The more return points the higher the cyclomatic complexity, and the more difficult it is to reason about. On the gripping hand, forcing a single return no matter what is just as evil, and can make things just as difficult to think about. – Dave Newton Oct 4 '11 at 16:25
    
There is a lengthy discussion about multiple return points in methods here: stackoverflow.com/questions/36707/… - Dave perfectly summarized it. – Guillaume Oct 4 '11 at 16:25
2  
@Harke: "But in using this type of return, all the conditions has to be check no matter what." Wrong. If Condition1 is false, no further conditions will be evaluated. – recursive Oct 4 '11 at 17:56

The top one is better, it will short circuit anyway. That means that if condition1 is false it won't check condition2 or condition3, so you don't save anything with the second method.

Also, skip the "is true" bit, you can just do:

return (Condition1 && Condition2 && Condition3)
share|improve this answer
function check() {
  return condition1 && condition2 && condition3;
}

The simplest solution is to find the value of the boolean and express and return that.

What is probably the most optimum solution is the following

function check() {
    var usefulConditionName = /* long condition */;
    var secondUsefulConditionName  = /* long condition */;

    return (usefulConditionName &&
        secondUsefulConditionName);
}
share|improve this answer

I usually think the less code and duplication, the better. I might go with

function check()
{
    return Condition1  AND Condition2  AND Condition3 ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no AND in JS. – svick Oct 4 '11 at 16:20

Neither. The best option is to return the value of the expression directly. There is no need for more verbosity. Also, JavaScript doesn't have AND operator, it has &&.

function check() {
   return Condition1 && Condition2 && Condition3;
}
share|improve this answer

IMHO I prefer the first technique, because : 1- Less line of code 2- Less return.

But everyone can have different opinion on question like this.

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