Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For my beginner's level independent study of Objective-C, I was asked to add a counter to a class, so that each time a method was used on it, it would ++. However, I misinterpreted this as "Each time the method the method is called, ++." After realizing how to do what was asked of me, I pondered how I could fashion a method that would return a counter in addition to what the method was called to return. If I were to use a static int in addition to variable++; on each call of the method, how can I extract that value of variable in my main program?

Example code from comment:

-(Fraction *) add: (Fraction *) f {
    static int fractaddcount;
    fractaddcount++;
    Fraction *result = [[Fraction alloc] init];
    result.numerator = numerator * f.denominator + denominator * f.numerator;
    result.denominator = denominator * f.denominator;
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
Please post code? That was a bit hard to follow. –  pcperini Oct 4 '11 at 16:35
1  
Some SSCCE would be great to clarify this question :) –  flob Oct 4 '11 at 16:35
    
-(Fraction *) add: (Fraction *) f { static int fractaddcount; fractaddcount++; Fraction *result = [[Fraction alloc] init]; result.numerator = numerator * f.denominator + denominator * f.numerator; result.denominator = denominator * f.denominator; return result; }\ –  Alex Mitchell Oct 4 '11 at 16:36
    
I'm sorry, I'm a tad n00bish at this... –  Alex Mitchell Oct 4 '11 at 16:37
    
You could edit the question and put that code there. It would be great to make it self contained - that anyone could copy it, compile it and run it without modification. –  flob Oct 4 '11 at 16:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make fractaddcount an instance variable and initialize it to 0 in the init method. Then it can be accessed by other methods in the class.

Additionally if you make it a property other classes will be able to access it. You can even make the property readonly in the .h file and read/write in the .m file (class extension).

Example:
in .h:

@property (non atomic, readonly, assign) int fractaddcount;

in .m:
in class extension:

@Interface TheClassName ()

@property (non atomic, readwrite, assign) int fractaddcount;

@end

in the implementation:

@synthesize fractaddcount;

in init: This is somewhat optional since when the class is instantiated the ivars are cleared to nil (0).

fractaddcount = 0;

in your code:

self.fractaddcount = self.fractaddcount + 1;
share|improve this answer
    
I don't have a separate init method... Am I missing something? –  Alex Mitchell Oct 5 '11 at 3:31
    
If you don't need to initialize anything you don't need one. All objects are guaranteed to be nil on class instantiation. It is common not to have an init method. –  Zaph Oct 5 '11 at 3:36
    
Then in this case, the way to add a counter to my add: method would be to throw in the @property line to my @interface section, the @ synthesize to my implementation, and throw self.fractaddcount=self.fractaddcount+1; to the add: method? –  Alex Mitchell Oct 5 '11 at 3:42
    
A couple of things: fractaddcount is an int ivar so we assume that class instantiation will set it to 0, that is not a bad assumption. You don't need to declare the fractaddcount property readonly in the interface, that is just good programming. If you do then you need to redeclare the fractaddcount property to read write in a class extension not the class implementation. I am going to add that code to my answer. –  Zaph Oct 5 '11 at 3:48
    
I'm sorry, I don't have a "class extension." I really am a beginner, and only have an interface, implementation, and a main.m. If this is way beyond my skill-set now, I would certainly take that as a valid answer. –  Alex Mitchell Oct 5 '11 at 3:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.