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I have to write a program that can calculate the powers of 2 power 2010 and to find the sum of the digits. eg:

if `2 power 12 => gives 4096 . So 4+0+9+6 = 19 . 

Now i need to find the same for 2 power 2010.

Please help me to understand.

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So you have to do up to 2^2010? –  Doug T. Oct 4 '11 at 16:44
    
yes, I have to calculate the value of 2^2010 and should store and display the same. –  Angus Oct 4 '11 at 16:49
3  
This is most likely a trick question, since no c base type can hold a number with all of its 605 digits. Ask someone who is proficient with maths. –  aquaherd Oct 4 '11 at 16:52
    
you'll either need an arbitrary-length integer arithmetic library, or you need to implement arbitrary-length integer arithmetic yourself to do this. –  Tilo Oct 19 '11 at 18:52
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6 Answers

Here's something to get you started:

char buf[2010]; // 2^2010 < 10^2010 by a huge margin, so buffer size is safe
snprintf(buf, sizeof buf, "%.0Lf", 0x1p2010L);
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0x1p2010L ?? that's not valid C –  Jason S Oct 5 '11 at 11:46
10  
Yes it is valid C. –  R.. Oct 5 '11 at 13:47
2  
Via expensive (in space and time) arithmetic, basically just like what you'd perform doing it by hand. Actually it should be noted that printf is not required to show correct digits past DECIMAL_DIG places, but good implementations always show exact results, especially for floating point values which are actually integers (no fractional places). –  R.. Oct 5 '11 at 18:24
7  
Wow, I am amazed ! I never knew about such hexadecimal floating point constant. +1 ! –  Agnius Vasiliauskas Oct 15 '11 at 14:03
1  
Oh and as for not doing the summing, I was trying to leave OP with a little bit of work to do rather than doing OP's full homework assignment... –  R.. Oct 19 '11 at 20:05
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You have to either use a library that supplies unlimited integer length types (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bignum ), or implement a solution that does not need them (e.g. use a digit array and implement the power calculation on the array yourself, which in your case can be as simple as addition in a loop). Since this is homework, probably the latter.

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See the example here codeproject.com/KB/cs/Mathematics.aspx for a string based implementation. Since you only need addition - the only tricky thing is the carry step. –  Ofir Oct 14 '11 at 9:20
    
BTW, a simpler implementation can involve a binary representation (i.e. a 2011 long bit array) and repeatedly performing division by 10 on it (implemented as long division), storing the reminder in the array and storing the sum of answers. –  Ofir Oct 18 '11 at 15:10
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Knowing 2^32, how would you calculate 2^33 with pen and paper?

2^32 is 4294967296

4294967296
*        2
----------
8589934592

8589934592 is 2^33; sum of digits is 8+5+8+9+...+9+2 (62)

Just be aware that 2^2011 is a number with more than 600 digits: not that many to do by computer

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GMP is perhaps the best, fastest free multi-architecture library for this. It provides a solid foundation for such calculations, including not only addition, but parsing from strings, multiplication, division, scientific operations, etc.

For literature on the algorithms themselves, I highly recommend The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 2: Seminumerical Algorithms by Donald Knuth. This book is considered by many to be the best single reference for the topic. This book explains from the ground up how such arithmetic can take place on a machine that can only do 32-bit arithmetic.

If you want to implement this calculation from scratch without using any tools, the following code block requires requires only the following additional methods to be supplied:

unsigned int divModByTen(unsigned int *num, unsigned int length);
bool isZero(unsigned int *num, unsigned int length);

divModByTen should divide replace num in memory with the value of num / 10, and return the remainder. The implementation will take some effort, unless a library is used. isZero just checks if the number is all zero's in memory. Once we have these, we can use the following code sample:

unsigned int div10;
int decimalDigitSum;

unsigned int hugeNumber[64];
memset(twoPow2010, 0, sizeof(twoPow2010));
twoPow2010[63] = 0x4000000;
// at this point, twoPow2010 is 2^2010 encoded in binary stored in memory

decimalDigitSum = 0;
while (!izZero(hugeNumber, 64)) {
    mod10 = divModByTen(&hugeNumber[0], 64);
    decimalDigitSum += mod10;
}

printf("Digit Sum:%d", decimalDigitSum);
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A agree with GMP way, own implementation probably won't be as fast, mathematically proven as GMP. Unless one need it for school or something, then I would get down to binary instead of this. –  AoeAoe Oct 15 '11 at 19:11
    
I never recommend GMP for serious use since it has the rather fatal flaw (for a general purpose library) of aborting your program on out-of-memory errors. It's okay for playing around. –  paxdiablo Oct 18 '11 at 8:08
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This takes only a few lines of code in Delphi... :)

So in c must be the same or shorter.

function PowerOf2(exp: integer): string;
var
  n     : integer;
  Digit : integer;
begin
  result := '1';
  while exp <> 0 do
  begin
    Digit := 0;
    for n := Length(result) downto 1 do
    begin
      Digit := (ord(result[n]) - ord('0')) * 2 + Digit div 10;
      result[n] := char(Digit mod 10 + ord('0'))
    end;
    if Digit > 9 then
      result := '1' + result;
    dec(exp);
  end;
end;

-----EDIT-----

This is 1-to-1 c# version.

string PowerOf2(int exp)
{
    int n, digit;
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder("1");
    while (exp != 0)
    {
        digit = 0;
        for (n = result.Length; n >= 1; n--)
        {
            digit = (result[n-1] - '0') * 2 + digit / 10;
            result[n-1] = Convert.ToChar(digit % 10 + '0');
        }
        if (digit > 9)
        {
            result = new StringBuilder("1" + result.ToString());
        }
        exp--;
    }
    return result.ToString();
}

int Sum(string s)
{
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++)
    {
        sum += s[i] - '0';
    }
    return sum;
}

for (int i = 1; i < 20; i++)
{
    string s1s = PowerOf2(i);
    int sum = Sum(s1s);
     Console.WriteLine(s1s + " --> " + sum);
}
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he was asking for a solution in C –  Tilo Oct 19 '11 at 18:15
2  
@Tilo: Yes I know, but I don't want to do his homework and Pascal code is simple to understand. :) –  GJ. Oct 19 '11 at 18:40
2  
+1 on that GJ!! :-D –  Tilo Oct 19 '11 at 18:50
    
@GJ. I hope you don't mind, I added c# version of your code –  L.B Oct 19 '11 at 21:22
1  
@L.B Why not thanks... :) –  GJ. Oct 19 '11 at 22:37
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Here's how you can calculate and print 22010:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void AddNumbers(char* dst, const char* src)
{
  char ddigit;
  char carry = 0;

  while ((ddigit = *dst) != '\0')
  {
    char sdigit = '0';

    if (*src != '\0')
    {
      sdigit = *src++;
    }

    ddigit += sdigit - '0' + carry;

    if (ddigit > '9')
    {
      ddigit -= 10;
      carry = 1;
    }
    else
    {
      carry = 0;
    }

    *dst++ = ddigit;
  }
}

void ReverseString(char* s)
{
  size_t i, n = strlen(s);

  for (i = 0; i < n / 2; i++)
  {
    char t = s[i];
    s[i] = s[n - 1 - i];
    s[n - 1 - i] = t;
  }
}

int main(void)
{
  char result[607], tmp[sizeof(result)];
  int i;

  memset (result, '0', sizeof(result));
  result[0] = '1';
  result[sizeof(result) - 1] = '\0';

  for (i = 0; i < 2010; i++)
  {
    memcpy(tmp, result, sizeof(result));
    AddNumbers(result, tmp);
  }

  ReverseString(result);
  printf("%s\n", result);

  return 0;
}

You can now sum up the individual digits.

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