Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a cygwin application (a game: http://te4.org) that I want to profile to figure out why it's so slow on one of my machines. Since cygwin doesn't produce PDB files, the usual Windows-profiling suspects need not apply.

What's the state of the art for this sort of thing? I haven't found many encouraging things about using gprof (requiring custom libraries to be dropped in, etc.), but I'll go there if I have to.

share|improve this question
    
This method might not be easy to do, but it should tell you what the problem is. –  Mike Dunlavey Oct 4 '11 at 17:24
    
Yeah, the problem is that I want to profile something that's interactive, so flipping back and forth to gdb at the right time is going to be a serious pain. I've done that sort of sampling before (esp for application hangs), though, and it does indeed work if you're able to manage the timing. Thanks for the reminder. –  shaver Oct 5 '11 at 14:09
    
Yeah, what I do then is slow down the interactive code by either 1) putting a loop around it, or 2) in the debugger, create a data-change-watch. This puts the debugger into emulation mode, 1 or 2 orders of magnitude slower than normal, which does the same thing as "speeding me up". Then of course, the problem gets found/fixed, the program is put back to normal, and it's faster. –  Mike Dunlavey Oct 5 '11 at 14:39
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Cygwin has gprof. I don't know whether it's installed by default, but you can install it via the Cygwin setup.exe; it's part of the binutils package.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I've heard horror stories about getting it to actually work (see above regarding needing to replace libc or similar). I'll give it a swing, though, thanks. –  shaver Oct 27 '11 at 22:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.