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I am trying to understand a shell script.Following script is just a small portion of big script

#!/bin/sh
for i in `pgrep -f libflashplayer.so`
do
  PIDS=$PIDS$i","
done
echo ${#PIDS}
PIDS=`echo ${PIDS:0:${#PIDS}-1}`

I am not clear with what does

echo ${#PIDS}
PIDS=`echo ${PIDS:0:${#PIDS}-1}`

in above script mean?

** UPDATE **

After having understood the replies below here is the input

#npviewer. 2768 deel   11u   REG                7,0 19218930   262562 /tmp/FlashXX2j3xhT (deleted)
#npviewer. 2768 deel   12u   REG                7,0 32352982   262837 /tmp/FlashXX6R4nAq (deleted)
#npviewer. 2768 deel   17u   REG                7,0 27289825   262824 /tmp/FlashXXuVBqbu (deleted)
#npviewer. 2768 deel   18u   REG                7,0 21632133   262825 /tmp/FlashXXneoS8s (deleted)

and this input is given on following script

for i in `lsof -np $PIDS | grep deleted | grep /tmp/Fl*`
do
     PID=`echo $i | cut -d " " -f 2`
     FD=`echo $i | cut -d " " -f 6`
     FD=`echo ${FD:0:${#FD}-1}`
     echo $FD
done

the output is

11u
12u
17u
18

as per my understanding the output should be

11
12
17
18

So why is that not so?

share|improve this question
    
It loses the final comma from the list - obscurely. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 4 '11 at 17:59
    
Alternatively, you can to the same thing with PIDS=${PIDS%,} –  glenn jackman Oct 4 '11 at 18:02
    
@Jonathan Leffler how does it looses comma? I am not able to understand that part. –  Registered User Oct 4 '11 at 18:17
    
It gives you the substring from 0 to length -1, dropping the last character, which is a trailing comma. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 4 '11 at 18:47
    
@ ${#parameter} was a new thing for me.I have updated the question now please see. –  Registered User Oct 4 '11 at 18:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It counts the number of characters in the PIDS string, then trims the last comma off the end of the string.

# cat a.sh
#!/bin/bash

PIDS="1,2,3,4,5,"

echo "${PIDS}"
echo ${#PIDS}
echo "${PIDS:0:${#PIDS}-1}"
# ./a.sh
1,2,3,4,5,
10
1,2,3,4,5

In reply to your update, your output looks kind of weird to me. Shouldn't you be displaying token 4 instead of 6 in the second "cut"? Unless maybe I'm mis-understanding your input data. Here's what I got:

# cat a.dat
#npviewer. 2768 deel   11u   REG                7,0 19218930   262562 /tmp/FlashXX2j3xhT (deleted) 
#npviewer. 2768 deel   12u   REG                7,0 32352982   262837 /tmp/FlashXX6R4nAq (deleted) 
#npviewer. 2768 deel   17u   REG                7,0 27289825   262824 /tmp/FlashXXuVBqbu (deleted) 
#npviewer. 2768 deel   18u   REG                7,0 21632133   262825 /tmp/FlashXXneoS8s (deleted) 
# cat a.sh
#!/bin/bash

while read i; do
  PID=`echo $i | cut -d " " -f 2`
  FD=`echo $i | cut -d " " -f 4`  
  FD=`echo ${FD:0:${#FD}-1}`
  echo $FD
done < a.dat

# ./a.sh
11
12
17
18

Okay now I get exactly what you are asking and because I was on a Solaris box earlier and I'm on a Linux box now, I get different results. So I guess the exact syntax can vary depending on what shell/platform you are on.

But I did get it working on my Linux box running Firefox. The difference is that on my configuration, no matter how many windows OR tabs I open, it still falls under the same process ID (I'm running Xubuntu with Firefox 3.6). Ignoring that, we can still do what you are trying to do by running through the processes one at a time and extracting the file descriptors for each iteration. See example below:

user@host:~$ cat a
for p in `pgrep -f libflashplayer.so`
do
  for f in `lsof -p $p | grep tmp/Fl | cut -d " " -f 6 | while read fd; do echo ${fd%[a-z]}; done`
  do
    echo "cp /proc/${p}/fd/${f} ${HOME}/${p}_${f}.flvdone"
  done
done

user@host:~$ ./a
cp /proc/17492/fd/16 /home/user/17492_16.flvdone
cp /proc/17492/fd/19 /home/user/17492_19.flvdone
cp /proc/17492/fd/20 /home/user/17492_20.flvdone

Note that I didn't include the "delete" grep expression because it doesn't immediately delete the file under my configuration. See if you can modify this script to do what you are trying to do. I couldn't get the ${PIDS:0:${#PIDS}-1} part working on my machine either which is why I switch substring commands to use the "%" operator instead. It worked that way.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question now please see. –  Registered User Oct 4 '11 at 18:50
    
hmmm, I was also expecting what you mention how ever this is not happening. –  Registered User Oct 4 '11 at 20:23
    
Not sure if it matters, but I see you're using Bourne shell (#!/bin/sh) to execute your script but I was unable to run it properly doing the same. But after switching to bash (#!/bin/bash) it worked fine. –  roartechs Oct 4 '11 at 20:42
    
read this here sathyaphoenix.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/… the problem is PID consists of many values and FD also consists of many values.Try to run this script after opening many youtube pages you will be able to understand what I am asking. –  Registered User Oct 5 '11 at 5:08
    
By looping through your PIDs one at a time using an outer loop, you can make your script simpler. See my edited response. –  roartechs Oct 5 '11 at 10:01

Searching the Bash reference manual for "${#":

${#parameter}

The length in characters of the expanded value of parameter is substituted. If parameter is * or @, the value substituted is the number of positional parameters. If parameter is an array name subscripted by * or @, the value substituted is the number of elements in the array.

share|improve this answer
    
ok i got ${# from your link now I have updated the question now please see. –  Registered User Oct 4 '11 at 18:49

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