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I have a window that is subscribing to an event that is raised by an object. I'm subscribing to the event as follows:

m_Monitor.NewJob += new Monitor.NewJobEvent(NewJobEventHandler);

The event is being raised successfully and is calling my NewJobEventHandler just fine. The problem occurs when I try to make changes to any UI elements in the window. I get the follow exception:

System.Reflection.TargetInvocationException: {"The calling thread cannot access this object because a different thread owns it."}

I've had this issue before and I've used some "Dispatcher" with some "Action" to get around it. I'll admit that whole thing seem like magic to me and I really didn't understand it, but it did get me past the issue. Coming from a C++ background I'm a bit miffed that I can't access certain things because they are in different threads. But anyways, my NewJobEventHandler() routine is as follows:

private void NewJobEventHandler(JobInfo newJob)
{
    TreeViewItem tvItem = new TreeViewItem();
    tvItem.Header = "Job: " + newJob.ToString();

    //The following call is what causes the exception, yet I've used very
    //similar code to update the .Text property of a TextBox from another
    //thread
    OutputDataTree.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal,
                (Action)(() => { OutputDataTree.Items.Add(tvItem); }));
}

Anyone know why this doesn't work for me?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are creating the TreeViewItem in the worker thread, but use it in the UI thread. You'll have to create it in the Action.

private void NewJobEventHandler(JobInfo newJob)
{
    TreeViewItem tvItem = new TreeViewItem();
    string header = "Job: " + newJob.ToString();

    //The following call is what causes the exception, yet I've used very
    //similar code to update the .Text property of a TextBox from another
    //thread
    OutputDataTree.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal,
                (Action)(() => { 
                                  TreeViewItem tvItem = new TreeViewItem();
                                  tvItem.Header = header;
                                  OutputDataTree.Items.Add(tvItem); 
                               }));
}

This is of concern for any UI element you create, they need to be created in the UI thread to be useable.

share|improve this answer
    
Booya! There it is. That "Action" syntax gets more and more magical to me. I didn't know you could even have multiple statements in there. Thanks. –  Ultratrunks Oct 4 '11 at 21:25
1  
A good read is the lambda expressions page in msdn. Won't seem so magical after that. –  Femaref Oct 4 '11 at 21:52

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