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I have a bunch of Selenium tests written in Ruby. I record with the IDE and export HTML tests as Ruby(Test::Unit) tests. In my TestingProject (Ruby project created in NetBeans) I simply create a new file (TestFile.rb) and copy/paste in the recorded content that was exported from Selenium IDE. After a while I have a few files each testing a different part of our application.

TestFile1.rb
TestFile2.rb
TestFile3.rb

Currently to run the test I have a main.rb file and I call these test files like so:

#file name: main.rb
require "./FolderName/TestFile1.rb"
require "./FolderName/TestFile2.rb"
require "./FolderName/TestFile3.rb"

In ruby the "require" method takes the name of a file and executes the contents as ruby code. This method maintains a list of files it has already processed so it won't run any of these files more than once. However, I can't control the order of the files as they are executed nor can I rerun certain files without declaring them twice. How do I create a real test suite for my tests(programatically)? Please include steps. Thank you.

PS: This: Create JUnit TestSuite in a non-static way is not helpful to me. I would like steps in the context of my example. Thank you.

share|improve this question

Until you find a better answer you can do this in a somewhat ghetto way using eval...

def test1
  eval(File.open(File.expand_path('~/FolderName/TestFile1.rb')).read)
end

def test2
  eval(File.open(File.expand_path('~/FolderName/TestFile2.rb')).read)
end

def test3
  eval(File.open(File.expand_path('~/FolderName/TestFile3.rb')).read)
end

test1
test2
test3
test1
#etc

Like I said, this is the wrong way to do it but hopefully when someone sees my horrible way of doing it they will provide a better one.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a nice try but unfortunately it didn't work for me. The files are executing in their own order even though I ran test1 and then test2. In the output I can clearly see it ran test2 and then test1. – AdamT Nov 2 '11 at 15:12

How about this? Grab the test script files and order them in whatever fashion (alphabetically in this case) and just run them one at a time.

scripts = DIR.entries('~/FolderName').select { |e| e =~ /.+\.rb/ }
scripts.sort.each { |s| `#{RUBY} s`}
share|improve this answer

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